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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - 2 Kings 17:7-23

Though the destruction of the kingdom of the ten tribes was but briefly related, it is in these verses largely commented upon by our historian, and the reasons of it assigned, not taken from the second causes?the weakness of Israel, their impolitic management, and the strength and growing greatness of the Assyrian monarch (these things are overlooked)--but only from the First Cause. Observe, 1. It was the Lord that removed Israel out of his sight; whoever were the instruments, he was the... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - 2 Kings 17:21

For he rent Israel from the house of David ,.... In the times of Rehoboam the son of Solomon, when ten tribes revolted from him, signified by the rending of a garment in twelve pieces, ten of which were given to Jeroboam; and it is here ascribed to the Lord, being according to his purpose and decree, and which was brought about by his providence, agreeably to a prophecy of his, see 1 Kings 11:30 . and they made Jeroboam the son of Nebat king ; of themselves, without consulting the Lord... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:1-41

THE REIGN OF HOSHEA OVER ISRAEL . DESTRUCTION OF THE ISRAELITE KINGDOM , AND THE GROUNDS OF IT RE - PEOPLING OF THE KINGDOM BY ASSYRIAN COLONISTS . read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:6-23

Captivity and its cause. Here is the beginning of the dispersion of Israel. Soon that favored nation will be "a people scattered and peeled." These verses give us the explanation of Israel's exile. It is a solemn warning against the neglect of opportunities. I. COMMANDS DISOBEYED . "They rejected his statutes" ( 2 Kings 17:15 ); "They left all the commandments of the Lord their God" ( 2 Kings 17:16 ); "They served idols, whereof the Lord had said unto them, Ye shall not do this... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:7-23

The provocations which induced God to destroy the Israelite kingdom. Here, for once, the writer ceases to be the mere historian, and becomes the religious teacher and prophet, drawing out the lessons of history, and justifying the ways of God to man. As Bahr says, he " does not carry on the narrative as taken from the original authorities, but himself here begins a review of the history and fate of Israel, which ends with 2 Kings 17:23 , and forms an independent section by itself."... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:7-23

The lessons to be learnt from the destruction of the kingdom of Samaria. The first and main lesson is, of course, the great fact— I. THAT NATIONS ARE TREATED BY GOD AS RESPONSIBLE UNITS , AND ARE PUNISHED , EVEN DESTROYED , FOR THEIR SINS . It was their "evil ways," their transgression against the commandments of God, that lay at the root of Israel's rejection. The prophets Hosea and Amos paint an awful picture of the condition of Samaria under its later... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:7-23

Review of the history of Israel. The Bible does not simply relate, but draws aside the veil and shows us the innermost springs of God's providence, and how they work. It teaches us to understand the deepest causes of the rise and fall of nations. The causes it insists on are not economical, or political, or intellectual, but religious, and its lessons are for all time. We may say of this survey of Israel's history—these things "are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:9-23

A great privilege, wickedness, and ruin. "For so it was," etc. We have used the first verses of this chapter, in our last sketch, to set forth the aspects of a corrupt nation . The Israelitish people appear in that fragment of their history as an unfortunate inheritor of wrong, a guilty worker of wrong, and a terrible victim of wrong. These fifteen verses now under our notice present to us three subjects of thought—a great national privilege; a great national wickedness; and a great... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Kings 17:21

For he rent ; rather, for he had rent. The nexus of the verse is with 2 Kings 17:18 . The difference between the fates of Israel and Judah—the survival of Judah for a hundred and thirty-four years—is traced back to the separation under Rehoboam, and to the wicked policy which Jeroboam then pursued, and left as a legacy to his successors. Israel could suffer alone, while Judah was spared, because the kingdom of David and Solomon had been rent in twain, and the two states had thenceforth... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - 2 Kings 17:21

The strong expression “drave Israel” is an allusion to the violent measures whereto Jeroboam had recourse in order to stop the efflux into Judea of the more religious portion of his subjects 2 Chronicles 11:13-16, the calling in of Shishak, and the permanent assumption of a hostile attitude toward the southern kingdom. read more

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