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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1-11

We may observe here, 1. The wisest and best cannot give every body content. Solomon enriched and advanced his kingdom, did all (one would think) that could be done to make then happy and easy; and yet either he was indiscreet in burdening them with the imposition of taxes and services, or at least there was some colour of reason to think him so. No man is perfectly wise. It is probable that it was when Solomon had declined from God and his duty that his wisdom failed him, and God left him to... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - 2 Chronicles 10:1

Rehoboam went to Shechem - This chapter is almost word for word the same as 1 Kings 12:1-19, to the notes on which the reader is referred. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1

This verse would have been far better placed last in the previous chapter, but now, left without note of time, it purports to tell us that (whereas by the last clause of the previous chapter "Rehoboam reigned in his" father Solomon's "stead," and had been presumably accepted as his heir and successor in Jerusalem and all Judaea) Rehoboam, now somewhat later on, repairs to Shechem (the ancient capital, and the prized position of the high-spirited tribe of Ephraim) to receive some final... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1

The coronation of a king. I. THE PERSON OF THE MONARCH . Rehoboam, the man "who enlarges the people," a name upon which his subsequent history was a satire. 1 . The child of a heathen mother. This was Naamah, the Ammonitess ( 2 Chronicles 12:13 ; 1 Kings 14:31 ), a daughter of the last Ammonite king, Hanun, the son of Nahash ( 1 Chronicles 19:1 , etc.). Rehoboam probably suffered in character and constitution from his taint of heathen blood. 2 . The son of a... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1-4

Two young men. These two young men, Rehoboam and Jeroboam—for we may regard them as such, though the former was forty years old when he began to reign—may be viewed together, as they were brought together, and may furnish us with some useful suggestions for the guidance of our life. We have them— I. STARTING FROM DIFFERENT ENDS OF THE SOCIAL SCALE . Rehoboam born in the palace, born to the purple, surrounded with every luxury, accustomed to the utmost deference,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1-19

The verses of this chapter, nineteen in number, correspond with those of 1 Kings 12:1-19 . They so correspond as to convince us that both writers took from one original, or, at any rate, one former source. But they are particularly instructive also in another direction. Our 1 Kings 12:2 and 1 Kings 12:3 are in order, and quite intelligible. 1 Kings 12:2 and 1 Kings 12:3 of the parallel are not so, and convince us either that the carelessness of copyists was more than usual (even... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:1-19

A notable and very mournful instance of lacking wisdom through not asking of God. The compiler of the Chronicles, in the pursuit of the special objects which he had in view, feels that he need lose no time in details, or in parts of the whole history, which were to be found elsewhere, but which were less important to his own object. The fifteenth verse of this chapter supplies us with an instance of this, its reference to Ahijah the Shilonite finding full explanation in the fuller parallel... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:2

The recall of an exile. I. THE EXILE 'S STORY . 1 . His name. Jeroboam, "whose people are many;" the son of Nebat. His father was an Ephrathite of Zareda, in Ephraim; his mother a widow ( 1 Kings 11:26 )—which may mean either that he had been born in unlawful wedlock ( LXX .), or that his father had died while he was young, leaving him to be brought up by his widowed mother (Josephus). 2 . His character. Courageous and industrious, "a mighty man of valour" ( 6:12 ; ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:2-3

In these verses the compiler brings up lost time. He has not mentioned before the name of Jeroboam, just as he has not mentioned the lustful sins of Solomon that led to idolatry, and these sequel idolatries of his, that heralded the shattering of his kingdom immediately on his decease. So we are now told all in one how Jeroboam, in his refuge-retreat in Egypt ( 1 Kings 11:26-40 ), "heard" of Solomon's demise, and apparently (see first clause of our third verse) heard of it in this wise, that... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Chronicles 10:3-19

The loss of a kingdom. I. A REASONABLE REQUEST PREFERRED , ( 2 Chronicles 10:3 , 2 Chronicles 10:4 .) 1 . A public grievance stated. The northern tribes, through Jeroboam, complained to Rehoboam that Solomon had made their yoke grievous. Whether this was tree or not has been much debated. 2 . A measure of relief demanded. "Make the heavy yoke of thy father lighter." Not only was this reasonable, but it should, have been a point in their favour, that they sought... read more

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