Read & Study the Bible Online - Bible Portal
Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:26-31

We have here an account of the conquest of Rabbah, and other cities of the Ammonites. Though this comes in here after the birth of David's child, yet it is most probable that it was effected a good while before, and soon after the death of Uriah, perhaps during the days of Bath-sheba's mourning for him. Observe, 1. That God was very gracious in giving David this great success against his enemies, notwithstanding the sin he had been guilty of just at that time when he was engaged in this war,... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:26

And Joab fought against Rabbah of the children of Ammon ,.... Of his being sent against it, and of his besieging it, we read in 2 Samuel 11:1 ; but it can hardly be thought that he had been so long besieging it, as that David had two children by Bathsheba; but the account of the finishing of it is placed here, that the story concerning Bathsheba might lie together without any interruption: and took the royal city ; or that part of it in which the king's palace was, and which, as... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:27

And Joab sent messengers to David ,.... To acquaint him how he had proceeded, and what success he had had: and said, I have fought against Rabbah ; laid siege to it, and skirmished with parties that sallied out upon them: and have taken the city of waters ; the same with the royal city, and so the Targum here renders it; so called because situated by the waterside; Adrichomius says F24 Theatrum T. S. p. 34. the river Jabbok flowed round about it: or it abounded with fountains... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:28

Now therefore gather the rest of the people together ,.... The rest of the soldiers in the land of Israel, and come to Rabbah: and encamp against the city ; invest it in form: and take it ; upon a surrender or by storm; for it could not hold out long: lest I take the city, and it be called after my name ; so great a regard had Joab, though an ambitious man, to the fame and credit of David his king: so Craterus F1 Curt. Hist. l. 6. c. 6. at the siege of Artacacna, being... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - 2 Samuel 12:26

And took the royal city - How can this be, when Joab sent to David to come to take the city, in consequence of which David did come and take that city? The explanation seems to be this: Rabbah was composed of a city and citadel; the former, in which was the king's residence, Joab had taken, and supposed he could soon render himself master of the latter, and therefore sends to David to come and take it, lest, he taking the whole, the city should be called after his name. read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - 2 Samuel 12:27

And have taken the city of waters - The city where the tank or reservoir was that supplied the city and suburbs with water. Some think that the original, המים עיר את לכדתי lachadti eth ir hammayim , should be translated I have intercepted, or cut off, the waters of the city: and Houbigant translates the place, et aquas ab urbe jam derivavi ; "And I have already drawn off the waters from the city." This perfectly agrees with the account in Josephus, who says των τε ὑδατων... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:15-31

The facts are: 1 . The child born to David becoming very sick, he entreats God for its life by prayer and fasting. 2 . He persists in refusing the consolations which the elders of his household offer him. 3 . The child dying on the seventh day and David observing the whisperings of his servants, at once ascertains by direct inquiry the certainty of it. 4 . His servants noticing that, on ascertaining the fact of the child's death, he lays aside the tokens of grief and resumes... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:26

Joab … took the royal city. As the siege of Rabbah would be conducted by the slow process of blockade, it might easily be prolonged into the second year, and so give ample space for David's sin and its punishment by the death of the child. But more probably the narrator, having commenced the history of David's sin, completes the story before returning to his account of the war. Thus the capture of Rabbah would occupy some of the interval between David's adultery and Nathan's visit of rebuke,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - 2 Samuel 12:26-31

( 1 Chronicles 20:1-8 :l-3) The fall of Rabbah. This event, which occurred after a two years' siege, between the fall of David and his repentance, presents several significant contrasts. 1 . Material success associated with moral failure. His army victorious, his enterprise terminating in triumph; David himself overcome by temptation, and troubled with a guilty conscience. Worldly success and prosperity are no true measure of moral worth and inward peace and happiness. 2 . ... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - 2 Samuel 12:27

The city of waters - The lower town of Rabbah (the modern Ammam), so called from a stream which rises within it and flows through it. The upper town with the citadel lay on a hill to the north of the stream, and was probably not tenable for any length of time after the supply of water was cut off. read more

Group of Brands