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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:1-40

This most lively and excellent discourse is so entire, and the particulars of it are so often repeated, that we must take it altogether in the exposition of it, and endeavour to digest it into proper heads, for we cannot divide it into paragraphs. I. In general, it is the use and application of the foregoing history; it comes in by way of inference from it: Now therefore harken, O Israel, Deut. 4:1. This use we should make of the review of God's providences concerning us, we should by them be... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:18

The likeness of anything that creepeth on the ground ,.... As serpents by many; and indeed that creature is introduced into almost all the idolatries of the Heathens, which seems to take its rise from the serpent Satan made use of to deceive our first parents: the likeness of any fish that is in the waters beneath the earth ; as the crocodile and hippopotamus, or river horse, by the Egyptians; and Dagon and Derceto, supposed to be figures in the form of a fish, among the Phoenicians. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:1-28

The curse of idolatry. Idolatry is the general bias of fallen humanity, the perversion of an innate principle, the misgrowth of the religious instinct. Men everywhere "feel after God, if haply they may find him." Absolute atheism cannot long endure anywhere. If men reject a personal Deity, they invent an inferior God, and practically worship that. The wildest atheist which the world has seen, must admit that there is some power or force in the world superior to himself. There is no... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:1-40

EXPOSITION ADMONITIONS AND EXHORTATIONS . Moses, having presented to the people certain facts in their recent history which had in them a specially animating and encouraging tendency, proceeds to direct his discourse to the inculcation of duties and exhortations to obedience to the Divine enactments. This portion also of his address is of an introductory character as well as what precedes. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:11-20

Israel's peculiar relation to God. This paragraph sets forth in earnest appeal the peculiar and distinctive relation to God in which Israel was placed. (For the precise details of the point in their history here referred to, see Exodus 19:1-25 .; and for the application of several of the expressions used both here and there to believers in Christ under the Christian dispensation, see 1 Peter 2:9 .) Here is a noble theme for the preacher—Israel ' s special relation to God , typical... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:15-20

As the people had seen no form or figure when God spake to them, so they were to beware for their very lives (cf. Deuteronomy 4:9 ) of acting corruptly by making any kind of image, whether of man or of beast, for the purpose of worshipping God as represented by it; they were also to beware of being so attracted by the splendor of the heavenly bodies as to be forcibly seduced to worship them and offer them religious service. They were not in this respect to imitate the heathen; for God, who... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:15-20

Warning against heathenish idolatry. I. THE ORIGIN OF HEATHEN IDOLATRY . The result of a "corruption" (Per. 16). Not a stage in the advance upwards from fetishism, etc.; but, as inquiries are tending more and more to show, the consequence: 1. Of a depravation of the idea of God. 2. Of a corruption of the worship of God. 3. Arising in turn from the substitution of the creature for God in the affections (cf. Romans 1:20-26 ). II. THE FORMS OF HEATHEN ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:15-24

The Divine jealousy of graven images. The great temptation of Israel was to idolatry. Images were worshipped by all those nations among whom they came, and they were in constant danger of conforming to the sinful practice. Hence this warning and statement about the Divine jealousy. Let us observe— I. THAT JEALOUSY PRESUPPOSES LOVE . Love must be strong as death, else jealousy will not be cruel as the grave; nor will its coals prove coals of fire, having a most vehement flame... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:15-24

The Divine jealousy of graven images. The great temptation of Israel was to idolatry. Images were worshipped by all those nations among whom they came, and they were in constant danger of conforming to the sinful practice. Hence this warning and statement about the Divine jealousy. Let us observe— I. THAT JEALOUSY PRESUPPOSES LOVE . Love must be strong as death, else jealousy will not be cruel as the grave; nor will its coals prove coals of fire, having a most vehement flame... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 4:17-18

The likeness —the figure— of any beast , etc. A warning against the animal-worship of Egypt. read more

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