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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:1-11

Here is, I. A law for the relief of poor debtors, such (we may suppose) as were insolvent. Every seventh year was a year of release, in which the ground rested from being tilled and servants were discharged from their services; and, among other acts of grace, this was one, that those who had borrowed money, and had not been able to pay it before, should this year be released from it; and though, if they were able, they were afterwards bound in conscience to repay it, yet thenceforth the... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:11

For the poor shall never cease out of the land ,.... There would be always such objects to exercise their charity and beneficence towards, John 12:8 , which is no contradiction to Deuteronomy 15:4 for had they been obedient to the laws of God, they would have been so blessed that there would have been none; so the Targums; but he foresaw that they would not keep his commands, and so this would be the case, and which he foretells that they might expect it, and do their duty to them, as... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Deuteronomy 15:11

For the poor shall never cease out of the land - To this passage our Lord appears to allude Mark 14:7 ; : For ye have the poor with you always. God leaves these in mercy among men to exercise the feelings of compassion, tenderness, mercy, etc. And without occasions afforded to exercise these, man would soon become a Stoic or a brute. read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Deuteronomy 15:11

Verse 11 11.For the poor shall never cease out of the land. The notion (147) of those is far fetched who suppose that there would be always poor men among them, because they would not keep the law, and consequently the land would be barren on account of their unrighteousness. I admit that this is true; but God does not here ascribe it to their sins that there would always be some beggars among them, but only reminds them that there would never be wanting matter for their generosity, because He... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:1-11

A bulwark against cupidity. Material prosperity was the only form of blessing that had attractive charm for the Hebrews. Neither mind nor conscience was yet sufficiently developed to value higher good. God had to raise them by slow and successive steps. Material prosperity had its dangerous side. It might foster pride, self-sufficiency, a sense of overweening superiority, and might lead to tyrannous treatment of others. Or, used in devout recognition of God, it might give scope for... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:1-12

The Lord's release. The sabbatic year was in many respects a year of mercy to the poor. The beautiful name given to it here—"the Lord's release"—suggests gospel ideas. It finds its higher counterpart in that "acceptable year of the Lord" ( Luke 4:19 ), which is the true "Lord's release." Christ came "to preach the gospel to the poor," and "to preach deliverance to the captives " ( Luke 4:18 ). This "accepted time" is the period of God's forbearance with our sins ( 2 Corinthians 5:19... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:7-11

The reference to the release leads to a prescription regarding readiness to lend to the poor. They were not to harden their hearts against their poorer brethren, nor were they, in the prospect of the year of release, to refuse to lend them what was necessary for their uses, but, on the contrary, were to open their heart and their hand to them according to their need, lest the poor should appeal against them to God, and sin should lie upon them. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:7-11

The duty of kindness to the poor. There seems to be at first sight a discrepancy between the phrase in Deuteronomy 15:4 and that in Deuteronomy 15:11 . The former is, "Save when there shall be no poor among you;" the latter, "The poor shall never cease out of the land." The first phrase is, however, a reason assigned for the injunction which had been given: it is equivalent to, "Simply, that there be no poor among you," i . e . this or that was an appointment in Israel, in order... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:7-11

Open-handedness. Having inculcated the forgiveness of a brother's debts during the sabbatic year, Moses now proceeds to speak of the open-handedness which should precede that year. It might be made a pretext for refusing a poor brother a helping hand that the year was almost on when the debt would be cancelled legally; but to make this a pretext for niggardliness would only betray wickedness of heart. The most beautiful consideration is thus inculcated for the poor; and as "the poor shall... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 15:11

They were to open their hand wide to their poorer brethren, for there should always be such in the land. This statement is not inconsistent with that in Deuteronomy 15:4 , for there it is the prevention of poverty by not dealing harshly with the poor that is spoken of; here it is the continuance of occasion for the relief of the poor that is referred to. read more

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