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Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments - Deuteronomy 28:34

Deuteronomy 28:34. Thou shalt be mad for the sight of thine eyes Quite bereaved of all comfort and hope, and abandoned to utter despair. “Into what madness, fury, and desperation have they been pushed,” says Bishop Newton, in illustration of this prophecy, “by the cruel usage, extortions, and oppressions which they have undergone! We will allege only two similar instances, one from ancient, and one from modern history. After the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, some of the Jews took... read more

Donald C. Fleming

Bridgeway Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

Obedience and disobedience (28:1-68)Further blessings and curses are now listed. These were connected more with the life of the people as a whole and were directly dependent on the people’s obedience or disobedience. The blessings mainly concerned agricultural prosperity, family happiness, victory over enemies and honour in the eyes of other nations (28:1-10). God’s assurance that he would supply their needs was linked to a warning. They were not to look for family increase or agricultural... read more

Thomas Coke

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible - Deuteronomy 28:34

Ver. 34. So that thou shalt be mad, for the sight of thine eyes which thou shalt see— Into what madness, fury, and desperation, have they been pushed by the cruel usage, extortions, and oppressions which they have undergone! We will adduce only two familiar instances, one from ancient, and one from modern history. After the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, some of the Jews took refuge in the castle of Masada; where being closely besieged by the Romans, they, at the persuasion of Eleazar their... read more

Thomas Constable

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable - Deuteronomy 28:15-68

D. The curses that follow disobedience to general stipulations 28:15-68In this section Moses identified about four times as many curses as he had listed previous blessings (Deuteronomy 28:1-14). The lists of curses in other ancient Near Eastern treaty texts typically were longer than the lists of blessings. [Note: Gordon J. Wenham, "The Structure and Date of Deuteronomy" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of London, 1969), p. 161.] The reason was probably to stress the seriousness of violating the... read more

Thomas Constable

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable - Deuteronomy 28:26-37

In the second view the outlook is worse. Israel would suffer physical distresses, and her enemies would plunder and oppress her. As freedom from Egypt came to epitomize God’s grace, so return to Egyptian conditions represented His judgment (Deuteronomy 28:27). read more

John Dummelow

John Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

The Blessing and the CurseThis chapter properly follows Deuteronomy 26:19, and concludes the second discourse. It enforces the injunctions given, by exhibiting the blessings associated with the keeping of them, and the curses entailed upon disobedience.1-14. The Blessings for Obedience.5. Store] lit. ’kneading-trough’ as in Exodus 12:34. The basket is that used for holding bread: see Genesis 40:17; Leviticus 8:2; Matthew 14:20.7. Seven ways] (at once), a proverbial saying expressing a... read more

William Nicoll

Expositor's Dictionary of Texts - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

A Blessing on the Storehouse Deuteronomy 28:8 The storing of the grain is the last of the processes of harvest. We may therefore take the blessing of God upon the housed and winnowed corn as including His blessing upon all previous stages of growth or ingathering. I. The Sowing Time This is where industry comes in, and the gift of God is seen also to be His reward and blessing upon human diligence. The preparation of the soil and the choice of the seed application to human life. II. The... read more

William Nicoll

Expositor's Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

MOSES’ FAREWELL SPEECHESDeuteronomy 4:1-40, Deuteronomy 27:1-26; Deuteronomy 28:1-68; Deuteronomy 29:1-29; Deuteronomy 30:1-20.WITH the twenty-sixth chapter the entirely homogeneous central portion of the Book of Deuteronomy ends, and it concludes it most worthily. It prescribes two ceremonies which are meant to give solemn expression to the feeling of thankfulness which the love of God, manifested in so many laws and precepts, covering the commonest details of life, should have made the... read more

Arno Clemens Gaebelein

Arno Gaebelein's Annotated Bible - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

24. The Blessing and the Curse CHAPTER 28 1. The blessing promised (Deuteronomy 28:1-14 ) 2. The curse announced (Deuteronomy 28:15-68 ) This is one of the most solemn chapters in the Pentateuch. Orthodox Hebrews read in their synagogues each year through the entire five books of Moses. When they read this chapter, the Rabbi reads in a subdued voice. And well may they read it softly and ponder over it, for here is prewritten the sad and sorrowful history of that wonderful nation. Here... read more

L.M. Grant

L. M. Grant's Commentary on the Bible - Deuteronomy 28:1-68

FROM MOUNT GERIZIM -- BLESSINGS (vs.1-14) Though Chapter 28 does not say that these blessings were pronounced from Mount Gerizim, yet Chapter 27:12 indicates this. But the blessings were prefaced; by the conditions of verse 1. They would be effective only if Israel diligently obeyed the voice of the Lord, observing carefully all His commandments. If so, God would set them high above all nations, and all the blessings that follow would come upon them (v.2). They would be blessed in the city... read more

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