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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:8-23

It is observable here that Moses, speaking of the Edomites (Deut. 2:8), calls them, ?our brethren, the children of Esau.? Though they had been unkind to Israel, in refusing them a peaceable passage through their country, yet he calls them brethren. For, though our relations fail in their duty to us, we must retain a sense of the relation, and not be wanting in our duty to them, as there is occasion. Now in these verses we have, I. The account which Moses gives of the origin of the nations of... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:16

So it came to pass, when all the men of war were consumed ,.... By wasting diseases and judgments of one kind or another: and dead from among the people ; the rising and surviving generation. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:1-23

EXPOSITION THE NEW BEGINNING AND REVIEW OF THE JOURNEYINGS OF ISRAEL FROM KADESH TO THE RIVER ARNON , THE FRONTIER OF THE AMORITES . At this point the language of address is exchanged for that of narrative. The change of subject from "ye abode" to "we turned," became necessary when Moses passed from exhorting and warning the people to narrating what happened after they resumed their journeyings; and gives no support to the notion of some... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:1-23

(specially Deuteronomy 2:7 ). God's knowledge of our pilgrimage. (For the historical and geographical details connected with this section, see the Exposition.) Moses here reviews the career of Israel during the wanderings, with reference to their treatment of the nations through whose territory they required to pass on their way. They, though the favored people of Jehovah, were not allowed to transgress the common laws of righteousness, by levying any demands on the nations through... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:1-23

International relationships. The wilderness state is the most salutary for men. Prematurely to enter into the land of rest would prove an endless calamity. Theoretically, it is possible to gain heaven too soon. Even "the Captain of our salvation was made perfect through suffering." That heaven may be to us a perfect paradise, there must be complete harmony between the soul and its environment. I. GOD BRINGS NATIONS INTO CONTACT FOR RECIPROCAL MINISTRATION . SO long as... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:1-23

God's faithfulness in dealing with nations outside the covenant. We have here strict injunctions given to the pilgrims not to disturb the children of Edom, nor the Moabites, nor the children of Ammon, because they were occupying the district assigned them. These tribes, though related to Israel, were not in the covenant. Still God had guaranteed to them certain temporal blessings, and he shows himself faithful in his dealings with them. I. GOD IS A RIGHTEOUS GOVERNOR AMONG ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:4-20

Edom, Moab, Ammon. The Israelites are strictly enjoined not to molest these three peoples, or to attempt to rob them of any portion of their territory. The ground of this injunction is that God had given them the territory they possessed, and had not given it to the Israelites. Additional reasons why Israel was not to molest them lay in the facts that they were kinsmen ( Deuteronomy 2:4 ) and that Israel was amply provided for already ( Deuteronomy 2:7 ). God's people have little... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:10-24

The Emims, Horims, Zamzummins, etc. If these verses are part of the context of the original speech, and not a later insertion, they must be viewed as scraps of history introduced to encourage the Israelites in their work of conquest, and to dispel their apprehensions by showing what had been done by others. They suggest— I. THAT THE PRESENT MAY LEARN FROM THE PAST . History, sacred and secular, is a powerful influence in forming the characters of the living race. The... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:14-18

The wasting of the warriors. There was evidently a considerable knowledge of " the art of war" in the Israelitish host on leaving Egypt. Moses was versed in it, as in so much more, and the mixed multitude which accompanied the exodus would also contain men skilled in arms. And experience of opposition on the part of Amalek, etc; would elicit a martial spirit throughout the host. Moreover, the presence of seasoned men, or " veterans ," gives confidence to young troops in actual... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Deuteronomy 2:16-19

The generation that sinned having quite died out, the people were now to cross the border of Moab and advance to the conquest of the Promised Land. To the east of Moab was the country of the Ammonites; these, also, the Israelites were to leave unassailed, for the Lord had given to them their land for a possession (cf. Deuteronomy 2:9 ). read more

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