Read & Study the Bible Online - Bible Portal
Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Exodus 2:11-15

Moses had now passed the first forty years of his life in the court of Pharaoh, preparing himself for business; and now it was time for him to enter upon action, and, I. He boldly owns and espouses the cause of God's people: When Moses was grown he went out unto his brethren, and looked on their burdens, Exod. 2:11. The best exposition of these words we have from an inspired pen, Heb. 11:24-26, where we are told that by this he expressed, 1. His holy contempt of the honours and pleasures of... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Exodus 2:12

And he looked this way, and that way ,.... All around, to observe if there were any within sight who could see what he did; which did not arise from any consciousness of any evil he was about to commit, but for his own preservation, lest if seen he should be accused to Pharaoh, and suffer for it: and when he saw that there was no man ; near at hand, that could see what he did, and be a witness against him: he slew the Egyptian, and hid him in the sand ; in a sandy desert place hard... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Exodus 2:12

Verse 12 12.And he looked this way and that way. Hence it more evidently appears that Moses came with the design of succouring his unhappy brethren, and of relieving and aiding them with his help, since, by killing the Egyptian, he avenged the injury done indeed to an individual, but having a bearing on the whole nation. But although he was inspired by the Holy Spirit with special courage for the performance of this act, still it was accompanied with an infirmity, which shews that he did not... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:11-12

§1. Moses as a would-be deliverer. Moses, as a would-be deliverer, shows us how zeal may outrun discretion. Actuated by deep love for his brethren, he had quitted the court, resigned his high prospects, thrown in his lot with his nation, and "gone out" to see with his own eyes their condition. No doubt he came upon many sights which vexed and angered him, but was able to restrain himself. At last, however, he became witness of a grievous — an extreme — case of oppression. Some Hebrew, we... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:11-12

The choice of Moses. Underlying this episode of killing the Egyptian there is that crisis in the history of Moses to which reference is made so strikingly in the eleventh of the Hebrews — "By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter; choosing rather," etc. ( Hebrews 11:24-27 ). Two views may be taken of the episode. Either, as might be held, the elements of decision were floating in an unfixed state in the mind of Moses, when this event... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:11-15

FIRST ATTEMPT OF MOSES TO DELIVER HIS NATION , AND ITS FAILURE . After Moses was grown up — according to the tradition accepted by St. Stephen ( Acts 7:23 ), when he was "full forty years old" — having become by some means or other acquainted with the circumstances of his birth, which had most probably never been concealed from him, he determined to "go out" to his brethren, see with his own eyes what their treatment was, and do his best to alleviate it. He had... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:11-15

Unpurified zeal. We must certainly attribute the killing of the Egyptian, not to Divine inspiration, but to the natural impetuosity of Moses' character. At this stage Moses had zeal, but it was without knowledge. His heart burned with indignation at the wrongs of his brethren. He longed to be their deliverer. Something told him that "God by his hand would deliver them" ( Acts 7:25 ). But how to proceed he knew not. His plans had taken no definite shape. There was no revelation, and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:11-15

Moses "was grown." According to the tradition he had already distinguished himself as a warrior — was "a prince and a judge" amongst the Egyptians, if not over the Hebrews ( Exodus 2:14 ). Learned, too, in all the wisdom of the day (cf Acts 7:22 ). At his age, forty years, with his influence, surely if ever he was to do anything for his people, now must be the time. Notice: I . THE HASTY MISCALCULATION OF THE MAN . 1. What he did, and why he did it. "It came into his... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Exodus 2:12

He looked this way and that way. Passion did not so move him as to make him reckless. He looked round to see that he was not observed,, and then, when he saw there was no man, slew the Egyptian. A wrongful act, the outcome of an ardent but undisciplined spirit; not to be placed among the deeds "which history records as noble and magnanimous (Kalisch), but among those which are hasty and regrettable. A warm sympathetic nature, an indignant hatred of wrong-doing, may have lain at the root... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Exodus 2:12

The slaying of the Egyptian is not to be justified, or attributed to a divine inspiration, but it is to be judged with reference to the provocation, the impetuosity of Moses’ natural character, perhaps also to the habits developed by his training at the court of Pharaoh. The act involved a complete severance from the Egyptians, but, far from expediting, it delayed for many years the deliverance of the Israelites. Forty years of a very different training prepared Moses for the execution of that... read more

Group of Brands