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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Hosea 13:5-8

We may observe here, 1. The plentiful provision God had made for Israel and the seasonable supplies he had blessed them with (Hos. 14:5): ?I did know thee in the wilderness, took cognizance of thy case and made provision for thee, even in a land of great drought, when thou wast in extreme distress, and when no relief was to be had in an ordinary way.? See a description of this wilderness, Deut. 8:15; Jer. 2:6; and say, The God that knew them, and owned them, and fed them there, was a friend... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Hosea 13:8

I will meet them as a bear that is bereaved of her whelps ,.... Which is a fierce cruel creature at any time, but especially when this is its case, being very fond of its whelps; and having taken a great deal of pains to lick them into form, as Kimchi and Ben Melech observe, it is the more enraged at the loss of them, and therefore falls upon man or beast it meets with the utmost fury: the phrase is expressive of the fiercest rage; see Proverbs 17:12 ; and will rend the caul of their... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 13:8

As a bear - bereaved - This is a figure to denote excessive ferocity. See the note on 2 Samuel 17:8 ; (note), where a remarkable instance is given. And will rend the caul of their heart - Every savage beast goes first to the seat of the blood when it has seized its prey; as in this fluid they delight more than in the most delicate parts of the flesh. There will I devour them like a lion - לביא labi , the old strong lion; drinking the blood, tearing the flesh, and breaking the... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 13:8

Verse 8 But he afterwards adds, I will rend, or will tear, the inclosure of their heart. They who understand the enclosure of the heart to be their obstinate hardness, seem to refine too much on the words of the Prophet. We know, indeed, that the Prophets sometimes use this mode of speaking; for they call that a hard heart, or a heart covered with fatness, which is not pliant, and does not willingly receive sound doctrine. But the Prophet rather alludes to the savageness of the bear, when he... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:1-8

Justification of the ways of God to man. Israel had been the cause of their own calamities—another proof that sin is the procuring cause of all human suffering and sorrow. God's character is seen to be everlastingly the same—long-suffering and merciful, ever gracious to penitents, abounding in goodness and truth to all, but by no means clearing the guilty. I. THE SECRET OF SUCCESS . Most men are fond of power, all men value prosperity; yet few men know the right road, and fewer... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:1-8

Ephraim, living and dead. This passage portrays anew the dreadful prevalence of apostasy and idolatry throughout the nation. "The same strings, though generally unpleasing ones, are harped upon in this chapter that were in those before" (Matthew Henry). Much of the imagery continues to be anthropopathic; the prophet exhibits an apparent tumult of contending passions in the Divine mind towards unfilial and rebellious Ephraim. I. EPHRAIM WAS ONCE ALIVE . He had been so, both... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:5-8

Mercy in beneficent action and in retributive displeasure. "I did know thee in the wilderness, in the land of great drought," etc. Mercy is the subject of these words; and mercy, like the mystic pillar that guided the Israelites in the wilderness, has two sides—a bright one to guide and cheer, and a dark one to confound and destroy. In these two aspects the text presents it. I. Here is mercy IN BENEFICENT ACTION . "I did know thee in the wilderness, in the land of great drought.... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:5-8

Self-exaltation. As Moses had foretold ( Deuteronomy 8:10-18 ; Deuteronomy 32:15 ), when Israel became prosperous, he forgot God, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. The exaltation of Baal was itself an act of self-will—a species of self-exaltation. The egoistic principle, however, had more direct manifestations. We have in these verses— I. GOD KNOWN IN ADVERSITY . "I did know thee in the wilderness, in the land of great drought" ( Hosea 13:5 ). 1. God knew... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:7-8

These verses teach that the result of their sins is inevitable destruction, and that Jehovah, merciful and gracious though he is, has now divested himself of all compassion on them. The appropriateness of the terrible figures here employed arises from the fact that Israel had been compared in the previous verse to a flock fed and filled in a luxuriant pasture; the punishment of that flock is now fitly compared to "the tearing in pieces and devouring of that fattened flock by wild beasts." The... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 13:8

I will meet them as a bear that is bereaved of her whelps, and will rend the caul of their heart. The noun דֹב is epicene, that is, the one form serves for both genders, as here the masculine includes the feminine, and is used as such. Of all animals, Jerome says, the she-bear is the fiercest, either when robbed of her whelps or in want of food. Seghor being that which encloses the heart, is either the pericardium, the immediate and proper enclosure of the heart, or the breast itself.... read more

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