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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Hosea 1:2-7

These words, The beginning of the word of the Lord by Hosea, may refer either, 1. To that glorious set of prophets which was raised up about this time. About this time there lived and prophesied Joel, Amos, Micah, Jonah, Obadiah, and Isaiah; but Hosea was the first of them that foretold the destruction of Israel; the beginning of this word of the Lord was by him. We read in the history of this Jeroboam here named (2 Kgs. 14:27) that the Lord had not yet said he would blot out the name of... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Hosea 1:7

But I will have mercy on the house of Judah ,.... The two tribes of Judah and Benjamin, which retained the true worship of God among them; see Hosea 11:12 and though they often sinned against the Lord, he showed them mercy, and spared them longer than the ten tribes; and though he suffered them to be carried captive into Babylon, he returned them again after seventy years: this is mentioned as an aggravation of the punishment of Israel, that Judah was spared, when they were not; and to... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 1:7

But I will have mercy upon the house of Judah - I will spare them as a kingdom after Israel has been carried away into captivity by the Assyrians. And will save them by the Lord their God - Remarkably fulfilled in the supernatural defeat of the army of the Assyrians, see 2 Kings 19:35 ; and so they were saved not by bow, nor by sword, nor by battle, nor by horses, nor by horsemen. The former expression may mean, not in war by horses, i.e., yoked to war chariots, nor by horsemen - nor... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 1:7

Verse 7 This verse sufficiently proves what I said yesterday, that the Prophet was specifically appointed to the kingdom of Israel; for he seems here to speak favourably of the Jews, who yet, we know, had been severely and deservedly reproved by their own teachers. For what does Isaiah say, after having spoken of the dreadful corruptions which then prevailed in the kingdom of Israel? ‘Come,’ he says, ‘into the house of Judah, they at least continue as yet pure: there,’ he says, ‘all the tables... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:3-9

Hosea's children. Not only was the prophet's marriage to be a sign; the children were to be for signs also. So, afterwards, were Isaiah's sons in Judah ( Isaiah 7:3 , Isaiah 7:14 ; Isaiah 8:3 ). Hosea's ill-starred children were cursed in the very names which they bore; and each of these was to be as a sermon to the nation. It may be that they personally walked for a time in their mother's evil ways; but whether or not, the names which they received concentrate into a focus Hosea's... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:3-9

Children of whoredoms. Hosea's children, like Isaiah's, were to be "for signs and wonders" in Israel ( Isaiah 8:18 ). Their names—Jezreel, Lo-ruhamah, Lo-ammi—were significant. A prophetic word was attached to each. I. JEZREEL . (Verses 4, 5) This first name—"God will scatter"—foretells Israel's scattering. Through it judgment is denounced 1. The character of an action is determined by its motive . By the "blood of Jezreel" is meant the slaughter of the seed of Ahab ( 2... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:4-9

The sufferings of Israel symbolically recorded. The three children of the prophet by Gomer symbolize at once a degree of sin and a period of suffering. The forefathers of Israel had been idolaters in their native laud and in Egypt, as we learn from the admonition of Joshua ( Joshua 24:14 ), "Put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt." But God took them into covenant with himself at Sinai; this new relation may be represented by the prophet's... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:6-7

God's mercy. "For I will no more have mercy upon the house of Israel; but I will utterly take them away. But I will have mercy upon the house of Judah, and will save them by the Lord their God, and will not save them by bow, nor by sword, nor by battle, by horses, nor by horsemen." This passage leads us to con template God's mercy. Mercy is a modification of goodness. God is good to all, but is only merciful to the suffering sinner. Mercy not only implies suffering, but suffering arising... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:7

But I will have mercy upon the house of Judah, and will save them by the Lord their God. Thus the contrast expressed in this verse increases the painful feelings with which the threatened abandonment and consequent destruction of Israel would be regarded. The promised mercy to the house of Judah is emphasized by the peculiar form of the expression. Instead of the pronoun, the proper name of Jehovah is employed; instead of saying, "I will save them by myself," he says in a specially emphatic... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 1:7

Divine deliverance. "But I will have mercy upon the house of Judah, and will save them by the Lord their God, and will not save them by bow, nor by sword, nor by battle, by horses, nor by horsemen." The contrast between the kingdoms of Judah and of Israel, in their nature and destiny, is here expressly declared. For Israel there was no hope; although pardon awaited any man amongst that people who turned unto the Lord, for no nation has been so godless, no family so vicious, but that every... read more

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