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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Hosea 4:1-5

Here is, I. The court set, and both attendance and attention demanded: ?Hear the word of the Lord, you children of Israel, for to you is the word of this conviction sent, whether you will hear or whether you will forbear.? Whom may God expect to give him a fair hearing, and take from him a fair warning, but the children of Israel, his own professing people? Yea, they will be ready enough to hear when God speaks comfortably to them; but are they willing to hear when he has a controversy with... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Hosea 4:5

Therefore shall thou fall in the day ,.... Either, O ye people, everyone of you, being so refractory and incorrigible; or, O thou priest, being as bad as the people; for both, on account of their sins, should fall from their present prosperity and happiness into great evils and calamities; particularly into the hands of their enemies, and be carried captive into another land: and this should be "in the day", or "today" F18 היום "hodie", Munster, Montanus, Drusius, Tarnovius, Rivet;... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 4:5

Therefore shalt thou fall in the day - In the most open and public manner, without snare or ambush. And the prophet also shall fall - in the night - The false prophet, when employed in taking prognostications from stars, meteors, etc. And I will destroy thy mother - The metropolis or mother city. Jerusalem or Samaria is meant. read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Hosea 4:5

Verse 5 The copulative is to be taken here for an illative, Fall, therefore, shalt thou. Here God denounces vengeance on refractory men; as though he said, “As ye pay no regard to my authority, when by words I reprove you, I will not now deal with you in this way; but I will visit you for this contempt of my word.” And thus God is wont to do: he first tries men, or he makes the trial, whether they can be brought to repentance; he severely reproves them, and expostulates with them: but having... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:1-5

Israel's sin and consequent suffering. The prophet is Jehovah's mouth-piece, and as such he calls on his fellow-men to hear the word of the Lord; he thus speaks by commission and with authority. Having thus claimed an attentive hearing in his Master's Name, he denounces Israel's sins, and declares the judgments that await them. In this discharge of his duty the prophet has a twofold object in view. By his timely and truthful warning he hopes to reclaim some, at least, of his countrymen, and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:1-5

The Lord's lawsuit. The introduction to the Book of Hoses consists of a symbolical narrative, contained in Hosea 1-3. The body of the book is occupied with discourses, which are full of mingled reproaches, threatenings, and promises. Hosea 4:1-19 . evidently reflects the condition of the nation during the interregnum which followed the death of Jeroboam II . The key-word of the first strophe ( Hosea 4:1-5 ) is the word "controversy" ( Hosea 4:1 ), used in the sense of a legal... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:1-5

The Lord's controversy. God had a controversy with the inhabitants of the land. The essential part of the indictment was that they had forsaken him . "There is no knowledge of God in the land." Hence— I. A FEARFUL OVERFLOWING OF IMMORALITY . 1. With the knowledge of God there had departed also "truth and mercy" ( Hosea 4:1 ). "Truth" and "mercy," or "kindness," are root-principles of morals. The subversion of them is the subversion of morality in its foundations. These... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:3-5

These verses relate, with much particularity, the sufferings consequent on sins, especially such as are specified in the preceding verses. The montaging of the land mentioned in Hosea 4:3 may be understood either figuratively or literally. If in the former way, there are many Scripture parallels which represent nature in full accord with human feelings, sympathizing with man, now in joy, again in sorrow; for example: "The little hills rejoice on every side;" the valleys "shout for joy,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:3-5

A terrible deprivation. "Therefore shall the land mourn, and every one that dwelleth therein shall languish, with the beasts of the field, and with the fowls of heaven; yea, the fishes of the sea also shall be taken away. Yet let no man strive, nor reprove another: for thy people are as they that strive with the priest. Therefore shalt thou fall in the day, and the prophet also shall fall with thee in the night, and I will destroy thy mother." These words lead us to consider a lamentable... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Hosea 4:5

The parallelism of this verse is marked by the peculiarity of dividing between the two members what belongs to the sentence as one whole. Instead of saying that the people would fall (literally, stumble ) in the day, and the prophet with them in the night, the meaning of the sentence, divested of its peculiar form of parallelism, is that people and prophet alike would fall together, at all times, both by day and by night, that is to say, there would be no time free from the coming... read more

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