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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 13:1-12

Job here warmly expresses his resentment of the unkindness of his friends. I. He comes up with them as one that understood the matter in dispute as well as they, and did not need to be taught by them, Job 13:1, 2. They compelled him, as the Corinthians did Paul, to commend himself and his own knowledge, yet not in a way of self-applause, but of self-justification. All he had before said his eye had seen confirmed by many instances, and his ear had heard seconded by many authorities, and he... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 13:1

Lo, mine eye hath seen all this ,.... Or "all those things" F8 כל אלה "omnia haec", V. L. Tigurine version, Beza, Michaelis; so Vatablus, Mercerus, Piscator, Codurcus. he had been discoursing of, concerning the wisdom and power of God, and his friends also; some of these he had seen instances of, he had been an eyewitness of them, and could give an ocular testimony to them; and others he had discerned with the eyes of his understanding, being opened and enlightened, and had a... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Job 13:1

Lo, mine eye hath seen all this - Ye have brought nothing new to me; I know those maxims as well as you: nor have you any knowledge of which I am not possessed. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1

Lo, mine eye hath seen all this, mine ear hath heard and understood it . All the particulars mentioned concerning God's government of the world in Job 12:6-25 are derived by Job from his own experience. His eye has seen them or his ear has heard them. He is not indebted to others for information on these simple points, which he regards as necessarily impressed by their experience on all grown men (see Job 12:9 ). read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1-2

The first two verses of Job 13:1-28 . are closely connected with Job 12:1-25 ; forming the natural termination to the first section of Job's argument, that all results, whether good or evil, must be referred to God. Job 13:1 is little more than a repetition of Job 12:9 and Job 13:2 of Job 12:3 . read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1-2

Trite sayings. Job's complaint is that there was nothing new in his friends' pretentious harangues. All their pompous airs of superiority and authority did not deceive the patriarch, and prevent him from detecting the essentially commonplace character of their ideas. I. MOST SAYINGS ARE TRITE . It is not often given to a man to discover a new truth. Even when a person makes a remark that is original in him, i.e. that he has not derived from any other man, the probability is... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1-12

Correction of the friends. I. TRANSITION IN JOB 'S ADDRESS . ( Job 13:1-3 .). He pauses for a moment before entering on a new course of thought. He asserts that his experience has not been without fruit. The eye , the ear , the mouth ( Job 12:11 ), are the physical symbols of living and actual experience. So St. John: "That which we have heard ,… seen with our eyes looked upon, and our bands have handled" ( 1 John 1:1 ). And in no particular is their knowledge, in... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1-16

Job to Zophar: 4. A wounded soul at bay. I. THE VOICE OF FIERCE RECRIMINATION . Transfixing on the spear-point of his remorseless logic the men who had mocked at his misery, and converted his very piety into a laughing-stock, with infinite scorn Job holds them up a spectacle to angels and to men, charging them with at least three most detestable offences. 1 . Ignoring of facts. They had favoured him with their views of how God conducted the affairs of the universe, citing... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 13:1-22

Man's injustice and the justice of God. Job proceeds to turn the tables upon these self-complacent friends, who are so disposed to moralize and find illustrations of their conceptions of the Divine righteousness at his expense. His friends, however, really do him a service; not, indeed, by manifesting the sympathy he craves, but by throwing him upon his own resources—still better, by throwing him upon his God. The tonic of opposition is sometimes far more needed in mental suffering than is... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Job 13:1

Lo, mine eye hath seen all this - I have seen illustrations of all that I have said, or that you have said about the methods of divine providence. read more

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