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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 17:10-16

Job's friends had pretended to comfort him with the hopes of his return to a prosperous estate again; now he here shows, I. That it was their folly to talk so (Job 17:10): ?Return, and come now, be convinced that you are in an error, and let me persuade you to be of my mind; for I cannot find one wise man among you, that knows how to explain the difficulties of God's providence or how to apply the consolations of his promises.? Those do not go wisely about the work of comforting the afflicted... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 17:11

My days are past ,.... Or "passed away", or "passed over" F23 עברו "transierunt", Pagninus, Montanus, &c.; ; not that they passed over the time fixed and appointed by God, for there is no passing the bound settled by him, Job 14:5 ; but either the common term of man's life was passed with Job, or he speaks of things in his own apprehension; he imagined his death was so near, that he had not a day longer to live; his days, as he before says, were extinct, were at an end, he... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Job 17:11

My days are past - Job seems to relapse here into his former state of gloom. These transitions are very frequent in this poem; and they strongly mark the struggle of piety and resignation with continued affliction, violent temptation, and gloomy providences. The thoughts of my heart - All my purposes are interrupted; and all my schemes and plans, in relation to myself and family, are torn asunder, destroyed, and dissipated. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:1-16

The general character of this chapter has been considered in the introductory section to Job 16:1-22 . It is occupied mainly with Job's complaints of his treatment by his friends, and his lamentations over his sufferings (verses 1-12). At the end he appeals to the grave, as the only hope or comfort left to him (verses 13-16). read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:1-16

Job to God: 3. The requiem of a dying man. I. ANTICIPATING HIS IMMEDIATE DISSOLUTION . With three pathetic sighs the patriarch bemoans his dying condition. 1 . The total collapse of his vital powers. Indicated by the shortness and offensiveness of his breath, announcing the approach of suffocation and decay. "My breath is corrupt." And to this at last must all come. The most vigorous physical health, as well as the feeblest, contains within it germs of putridity. Essentially,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:1-16

The just holds on his way. "The pencil of the Holy Ghost hath laboured more in describing the afflictions of Job than the felicities of Solomon," says Lord Bacon. "Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comfort and hopes. We see in needleworks and embroideries it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome ground; judge, therefore, of the pleasure of the heart by the... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:11

My days are past . My days are slipping away from me. Life is well-nigh over. What, then, does it matter what you say? My purposes are broken off, even the thoughts of my heart ; literally, the possessions of my heart ' all the store that it has accumulated—my desires, purposes, wishes. I no longer care to vindicate my innocence in the sight of men, or to clear my character from aspersions. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:11

The premature arrest of the purposes of life. Job looks out from the sadness of his present condition, and turns in thought to his past days, to the purposes of those days—the hopes he had cherished, the plans he had laid, even the thoughts of his heart. Alas l they are dashed—broken off. His purposes not accomplished, his plans useless, his hopes frustrated, his thoughts disappointed, his very days are past! How sad! how painful! We may reflect— I. ON THE LIABILITY , TO WHICH ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 17:11

Broken purposes. Job seems to be sinking back into despair after the hopeful and confident utterance of verse 9. Perhaps the explanation of the situation lies in the difficulty the patriarch experiences in squaring the convictions of his rising faith with the actual condition in which he now lies. He wonders how his innocence can be vindicated, how he can bold on and increase in strength, although he is now persuaded that God will help him ultimately to do so. Meanwhile all his purposes are... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Job 17:11

My days are past - “I am about to die.” Job relapses again into sadness - as he often does. A sense of his miserable condition comes over him like a cloud, and he feels that he must die.My purposes are broken off - All my plans fail, and my schemes of life come to an end. No matter what they could say now, it was all over with him, and he must die; compare Isaiah 38:12 :“My habitation is taken away, and is removed from meLike a shepherd’s tent;My life is cut off as by a weaverWho severeth the... read more

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