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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 38:25-41

Hitherto God had put such questions to Job as were proper to convince him of his ignorance and short-sightedness. Now he comes, in the same manner, to show his impotency and weakness. As it is but little that he knows, and therefore he ought not to arraign the divine counsels, so it is but little that he can do, and therefore he ought not to oppose the proceedings of Providence. Let him consider what great things God does, and try whether he can do the like, or whether he thinks himself an... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 38:34

Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds, that abundance of waters may cover thee? Thy gardens, fields, and farms; canst thou, in a magisterial way, call to and demand of the clouds to let down rain in large quantities, sufficient to water them and make them fruitful? no, thou canst not: thou mayest cry and call as long as thou wilt, not a cloud will stir, nor a drop of water be let down; rain is to be had in a suppliant way, through the prayer of faith, as by Elijah, but not in a... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Job 38:34

Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds - Canst thou produce lightning and thunder, that water may be formed, and poured down upon the earth? Thunder is called קלות koloth , voices; for it is considered the voice of God: here then Job's voice, קולך kolecha , is opposed to the voice of Jehovah! read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 38:1-41

The tone of the appeal is sustained at a high pitch, and the entire passage is one of extraordinary force and eloquence. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 38:31-41

Jehovah to Job: the first answer-the examination: 5. Concerning four worlds. I. THE WORLD OF STARS . Jehovah invites Job to reflect upon his own impotence, and therefore also inferentially upon his ( i.e. Jehovah's) omnipotence, as regards the phenomena of the heavens, over which the Power of God is exhibited in a fourfold degree. 1 . In creating the orbs of heaven. The constellations (Orion, Arcturus, the Pleiades, Mazzaroth) and the planets that adorn the nocturnal sky,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Job 38:34

Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds, that abundance of water may sever thee? Will the clouds take their orders from thee, listen to thee, obey thy voice? None but the "medicine-men" of savage tribes profess to have any such power. Elijah, indeed, "prayed, and the heaven gave rain" ( James 5:18 ); but this was a very different thing from "commanding the clouds of heaven." His prayer was addressed to God, and God gave the rain for which he made his petition. read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Job 38:34

Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds, that abundance of waters may cover thee? - That is, canst thou command the clouds so that they shall send down abundant rain? Bouillier supposes that there is an allusion here to the incantations which were pretended to be practiced by the Magi, by which they claimed the power of producing rain at pleasure; compare Jeremiah 14:22, “Are there any among the vanities of the Gentiles (the idols that they worship) that can cause rain? Art not thou he, O... read more

Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments - Job 38:34-35

Job 38:34-35. Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds? Either thundering in them, or calling to them with a loud voice, and commanding them to rain. That abundance of waters may cover thee? That is, may cover thy land, when it needs and requires rain. Canst thou send lightnings that they may go? At thy pleasure, and upon thy errand? and say, Here we are? Ready to do thy will, as servants to obey their master. “Nothing can be more elevated and sublime than this verse. How strong the... read more

Donald C. Fleming

Bridgeway Bible Commentary - Job 38:1-38

38:1-42:17GOD’S ANSWERControl of the natural world (38:1-38)Possibly an approaching storm was what prompted Elihu’s poetic praise of the God of nature (see 36:27-37:5). If so, that storm now broke, and through it the voice of God spoke to Job. Job had repeatedly challenged God to a contest. God now accepts (38:1-3).In his reply, God asks Job questions that he cannot answer, in order to show him how little he knows of the mind and activity of the Almighty. God begins his ironical questioning of... read more

James Burton Coffman

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible - Job 38:34

WHO HATH GIVEN UNDERSTANDING TO THE MIND?"Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds,That abundance of waters may cover thee?Canst thou send forth lightnings, that they may go,And say unto thee, Here we are?Who hath put wisdom in the inward parts?Or who hath given understanding to the mind?Who can number the clouds by wisdom?Or who can pour out the bottles of heaven,When the dust runneth into a mass,And the clods cleave fast together?"The highlight here is the question regarding the mystery of... read more

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