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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 41

The description here given of the leviathan, a very large, strong, formidable fish, or water-animal, is designed yet further to convince Job of his own impotency, and of God's omnipotence, that he might be humbled for his folly in making so bold with him as he had done. I. To convince Job of his own weakness he is here challenged to subdue and tame this leviathan if he can, and make himself master of him (Job 41:1-9), and, since he cannot do this, he must own himself utterly unable to stand... read more

Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 41:1-10

Whether this leviathan be a whale or a crocodile is a great dispute among the learned, which I will not undertake to determine; some of the particulars agree more easily to the one, others to the other; both are very strong and fierce, and the power of the Creator appears in them. The ingenious Sir Richard Blackmore, though he admits the more received opinion concerning the behemoth, that it must be meant of the elephant, yet agrees with the learned Bochart's notion of the leviathan, that it... read more

Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Job 41:11-34

God, having in the Job 42:1-6 shown Job how unable he was to deal with the leviathan, here sets forth his own power in that massy mighty creature. Here is, I. God's sovereign dominion and independency laid down, Job 41:11. 1. That he is indebted to none of his creatures. If any pretend he is indebted to them, let them make their demand and prove their debt, and they shall receive it in full and not by composition: ?Who has prevented me?? that is, ?who has laid any obligations upon me by any... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41

INTRODUCTION TO JOB 41 A large description is here given of the leviathan, from the difficulty and danger of taking it, from whence it is inferred that none can stand before God, Job 41:1 ; from the several parts of him, his face, teeth, scales, eyes, mouth and neck, flesh and heart, Job 41:11 ; and from various wonderful terrible things said of him, and ascribed to him, Job 41:25 . read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:1

Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook ?.... That is, draw it out of the sea or river as anglers draw out smaller fishes with a line or hook? the question suggests it cannot be done; whether by the "leviathan" is meant the whale, which was the most generally received notion; or the crocodile, as Bochart, who has been followed by many; or the "orca", a large fish of the whale kind with many teeth, as Hasaeus, it is not easy to say "Leviathan" is a compound word of than the first syllable... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:2

Canst thou put an hook into his nose ?.... Or a rush, that is, a rope made of rushes; for of such ropes were made, as Pliny F7 Nat. Hist. l. 19. c. 2. affirms; or bore his jaw through with a thorn ? as men do herrings, or such like small fish, for the convenience of carrying them, or hanging them up to dry; the whale is not to be used in such a manner: but the Tentyritae, a people in Egypt, great enemies to crocodiles, had methods of taking thorn in nets, and of binding and... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:3

Will he make many supplications unto thee ?.... To cease pursuing him, or to let him go when taken, or to use him well and not take away his life; no, he is too spirited and stouthearted to ask any favour, it is below him; will he speak soft words unto thee ? smooth and flattering ones, for the above purposes? he will not: this is a figurative way of speaking. read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:4

Will he make a covenant with thee ?.... To live in friendship or servitude, as follows; wilt thou take him for a servant for ever ? oblige him to serve thee for life, or reduce him to perpetual bondage; signifying, that he is not to be tamed or brought into subjection; which is true of the whale, but not of the crocodile; for several authors F9 Herodot, ut supra, (Euterpe, sive, l. 2.) c. 69. Aelian. l. 8. c. 2. & l. 10. c. 21. Solin. c. 45. Plin. l. 8. c. 46. speak of them as... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:5

Wilt thou play with him as with a bird ?.... In the hand or cage: leviathan plays in the sea, but there is no playing with him by land, Psalm 104:26 ; or wilt thou bind him for thy maidens ? or young girls, as Mr. Broughton renders it; tie him in a string, as birds are for children to play with? Now, though crocodiles are very pernicious to children, and often make a prey of them when they approach too near the banks of the Nile, or whenever they have an opportunity of seizing them ... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Job 41:6

Shall thy companions make a banquet of him ?.... The fishermen that join together in catching fish, shall they make a feast for joy at taking the leviathan? which suggests that he is not to be taken by them, and so they have no opportunity or occasion for a feast: or will they feed on him? the flesh of crocodiles is by some eaten, and said F13 Leo Africanus & Aelian. ut supra. (l. 10. c. 21.) to be very savoury, but not the flesh of the whale; shall they part him among the... read more

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