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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Jonah 1:4-10

When Jonah was set on ship-board, and under sail for Tarshish, he thought himself safe enough; but here we find him pursued and overtaken, discovered and convicted as a deserter from God, as one that had run his colours. I. God sends a pursuer after him, a mighty tempest in the sea, Jonah 1:4. God has the winds in his treasure (Ps. 135:7), and out of these treasures God sent forth, he cast forth (so the word is), with force and violence, a great wind into the sea; even stormy winds fulfil his... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Jonah 1:7

And they said everyone to his fellow ,.... That Jonah awoke and rose up, upon the shipmaster's calling to him, is certain; but whether or no he called upon his God is not; perhaps he did: and when his prayer was over, and the storm still continuing, the sailors said one to another, come, and let us cast lots, that we may know for whose cause this evil is upon us ; for, Observing something very uncommon and extraordinary in the tempest, and all means, both natural and religious, failing... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Jonah 1:7

Come, and let us cast lots - This was a very ancient mode of endeavoring to find out the mind of Divine Providence; and in this case it proves that they supposed the storm to have arisen on account of some hidden crime of some person aboard. A philosopher being at sea in a violent storm. when the crew began to call earnestly to the gods for safety, he said, "Be silent, and cease your prayers; for should the gods know that you are here, we shall all be lost." The lot fell upon Jonah - ... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Jonah 1:7

Verse 7 Jonah did not without reason mention this, — that the passengers consulted together about casting lots; for we hence learn, that it was no ordinary tempest: it appeared then to be a token of God’s wrath. For, if strong wind arose, it would not have been so strange, for such had been often the case; and if a tempest followed, it would not have been a thing unusual. It must then have been something more dreadful, as it filled men’s minds with alarms so that they were conscious that God... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:1-17

Part I. THE MISSION OF JONAH . HIS DISOBEDIENCE AND PUNISHMENT . read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:4-10

2. Jonah ' s foolish flight is arrested. In the midst of his fancied security God sends a great storm, and the ship is placed in imminent jeopardy. The crew try all means to save the ship, and at length cast lots to discover by this means for whose sake the tempest has been sent. The lot points out Jonah as the guilty person. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:4-10

An effective hue and cry. We see here a man who ought to run for God endeavouring to run away from him, and also how he speeds. The flight was illogical, a fatuous attempt to get outside the sphere of omnipresence, as much of our sin is a practical endeavour to get, or imagine ourselves, beyond the cognizance of omniscience. And it was made in the blindness of egoism and carnal self will—the qualities which are generally to be found at the bottom of ministerial unfaithfulness to the... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:7

Finding the storm still violent, the crew come to the conclusion that it is sent by Heaven in punishment of some crime committed by one on board; and they proceed to cast lots to discover the guilty person. Jonah doubtless had meantime complied with the captain's request, but, as the sailors saw, without visible effect. The belief that temporal calamities are often connected with the presence of culprits, and are sent in judgment, is found in classical authors. Thus Plautus, 'Rudena,' 2:21— ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:7-10

The fugitive convicted. "And they said every one to his fellow, Come, and let us cast lots, that we may know for whose cause this evil is upon us. So they cast lots, and the lot fell upon Jonah," etc. The prayers of the mariners, and Jonah's prayer, if indeed he tried to pray (although that is hardly likely; see Jonah 4:2 , "Then Jonah prayed"), led to no abatement of the storm. God's purpose was not to be accomplished in that way—Jonah was not to be restored in so easy a manner. But... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Jonah 1:7-10

Jonah detected. I. JONAH DETECTED BY THE LOT . Heathens cast that lot; still the disposal of it was of the Lord. He guided the fateful token, and so it fell to Jonah. Now that the Divine Spirit is given to those that seek him, we are released from dependence upon the indications of the lot. But still by things as little seeming as lot casting, backsliders are discovered to themselves if not to others. A cock crow detected the recreant Peter. And now by some memorial of... read more

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