Read & Study the Bible Online - Bible Portal
Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-13

This is part of the law concerning singular vows, extraordinary ones, which though God did not expressly insist on, yet, if they were consistent with and conformable to the general precepts, he would be well pleased with. Note, We should not only ask, What must we do, but, What may we do, for the glory and honour of God? As the liberal devises liberal things (Isa. 32:8), so the pious devises pious things, and the enlarged heart would willingly do something extraordinary in the service of so... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Leviticus 27:12

And the priest shall value it, whether it be good or bad ,.... Put a price upon it according to its worth, as it shall appear to him: as thou valuest it, who art the priest, so shall it be ; that shall be the price at which it shall be sold, not to the owner or devoter of it, for he must give more, as appears from Leviticus 27:13 ; but, as Jarchi observes, to all other men who come to purchase it. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-25

Singular vows. The loving heart will ask not only what must, but what may, be done; and the sacrifices offered in the flames of love are acceptable to God ( 2 Chronicles 6:8 ). These are the principles which underlie the laws concerning singular vows. I. THE SINGULARITY LIES IN THE ELEMENT OF SEPARATION . 1 . Hence the subject of the vow is styled a Nazarite. 2 . Jesus was a Nazarite in spirit. 3 . So are true Christians. II. THINGS MAY BE... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-33

Spontaneous devotion. The relations between God and his ancient people were not so rigid as they are sometimes supposed to have been. It was not all enactment on the one hand, and obedience or disobedience on the other. We find illustration here— I. THAT THE LAW OF GOD LEAVES AMPLE ROOM FOR THE PLAY OF SPONTANEOUS DEVOTION . Under the inspiring influence of some signal mercies, individual or national, the Israelite might devote to God either This was to be... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-34

A man might vow to the service of God whatever he had a right over, that is, himself, his wife, his children, his slaves, his beasts, his houses, his fields. In case persons were vowed, the rule was that they should be redeemed at a certain price, though occasionally the redemption was not made. Vowing a person to God thus, was, as a rule, no more than vowing so much money to the use of the sanctuary as was fixed as the price of the redemption of the person vowed. Yet there is a great... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-34

Vows are not instituted by the Mosaic legislation; they were already in existence as a habit of the Hebrew people, and they are only regulated by Moses. The principle on the subject of vows is that no one was bound to make a vow, but that when a vow was made, it must be observed by the payment of the thing vowed or its recognized commutation. Thus Deuteronomy 23:21 , "When thou shalt vow a vow unto the Lord thy God, thou shalt not slack to pay it: for the Lord thy God will surely require it... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-34

On keeping vows. cf. Ecclesiastes 5:4 , Ecclesiastes 5:5 ; Genesis 28:20-22 ; Genesis 35:1-7 . We have in this apparent appendix to the book an interesting chapter about keeping vows. Religious enthusiasm may very properly express itself in the dedication either of one's self, or a relative in whose destiny we have a voice, or a beast, or a house, or finally a field. Such a sense of special obligation may be laid upon us that we feel constrained to dedicate either a person, an... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-34

Vows and dues. I. We find here a representation of the union of righteousness and grace in the kingdom of God. The sacredness of vows and dues; but the estimation, by the priest, according to the ability of him that made the vow. The Law makes its claim, but God provides against its rigour. II. Comparison of the Law of God as given to his ancient people with the imperfect and cruel laws of merely human origin. Especially as to human sacrifices. The only human life which could be... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Leviticus 27:11-13

An unclean animal, which might not be sacrificed, if vowed, was to be valued at a price fixed by the priest. If its original owner took it back again, he was to pay this price and one-fifth more than the sum named; if he did not, it became the property of the sanctuary. The words, the priest shall value it, whether it be good or bad, should rather be rendered, the priest shall estimate it between good and bad, that is, at a moderate price, as though it were neither very good nor very bad.... read more

Donald C. Fleming

Bridgeway Bible Commentary - Leviticus 27:1-34

Valuations for things vowed (27:1-34)People often vowed things to God out of gratitude for his goodness to them, usually in some crisis they had met. If the offering vowed was a person, this person was not to be offered in sacrifice but was to be redeemed, or bought back, by the payment of money to the sanctuary. The amount to be paid was estimated by the priests according to the usefulness of the person offered. The priests were to give special consideration to a poor person who could not pay... read more

Group of Brands