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Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:9-14

The Pharisee and the publican. The lesson as to prayer is continued. The parable which follows exhibits the spirit and conditions of effectual prayer. Mark the two features of the audience specially addressed. He speaks to certain He spoke in the previous parable of "God's own elect." Now, the Pharisees accounted themselves the elect of God. They were puffed up by this confidence. They regarded themselves as the righteous, who kept the Law, beth oral and written. And, indeed, they were... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:9-14

The Pharisee and the publican. The scene indicated by our Lord's opening sentences is easily realized. We readily picture to our minds the place and the two persons in whom we are interested—the haughty Pharisee and the humble-minded publican. We readily imagine their demeanor as they enter, their posture as they pray, their reception as they pass through the courts going and returning. But we ask how and why was it that the Pharisee was rejected and the publican accepted. And in reply we... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:13

And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner! Utterly sad and heart-broken, the publican neither recounts nor thinks of good kind deeds done, or special sins committed; no thoughts came into that poor heart, such as, "I have done some fair deeds; I am not altogether vile and sinful." He felt that with him evil so far overbalanced good that he could make no plea for himself, and yet... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:14

I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted . And the publican was right; there was mercy even for him, all sin-stained though he was. The words with which the Lord closes his teaching are full of comfort. That prayer he tells us was heard and granted. The "I tell you" of Jesus here means, as Stier well puts it, "I tell you, for I know, I have seen, I have... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Luke 18:13

Standing afar off - Afar off from the “temple.” The place where prayer was offered in the temple was the court of women. The Pharisee advanced to the side of the court nearest to the temple, or near as he could; the publican stood on the other side of the same court if he was a Jew, or in the court of the Gentiles if he was a pagan, as far as possible from the temple, being conscious of his unworthiness to approach the sacred place where God had his holy habitation.So much as his eyes ... -... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Luke 18:14

I tell you - The Pharisees would have said that the first man here was approved. Jesus assures them that they judged erroneously. God judges of this differently from people.Justified - Accepted or approved of God. The word “justify” means to declare or treat as righteous. In this case it means that in their prayers the one was approved and the other not; the one went down with the favor of God in answer to his petitions, the other not.For every one ... - See the notes at Luke 14:11. read more

Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments - Luke 18:13-14

Luke 18:13-14. And the publican, standing afar off 1st, Under a sense of his being unworthy to be permitted to draw near to God, or to go up among his people into the court of Israel, though probably a Jew, he stood at a distance in the court of the Gentiles, probably without the stone wall, termed by the apostle, the middle wall of partition, which Gentiles and unclean Israelites were not permitted to pass. Or, if it seem more probable, from the Pharisee’s mentioning him in his prayer,... read more

Donald C. Fleming

Bridgeway Bible Commentary - Luke 18:1-14

107. Two parables about prayer (Luke 18:1-14)Because there may be an apparent delay before his return, Jesus told a parable to encourage his disciples. They may suffer injustice from opponents of the gospel, but they must persevere in prayer, confident that God will hear them (Luke 18:1). If an ungodly judge will give a just judgment to a helpless widow solely to be rid of her ceaseless pleading, how much more will the holy God answer the cries of his persecuted people. The world may be... read more

E.W. Bullinger

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes - Luke 18:13

standing : i.e. in a position of humility. afar off. Compare Psalms 40:12 .Ezra 9:6 . not . . . so much as = not even. Greek. ou ( App-105 .) oude. unto . Greek. eis. App-104 . heaven = the heaven. Singular. See note on Matthew 6:9 , Matthew 6:10 . smote, &c. = was smiting, &c., or, began to smite. Expressive of mental grief. Compare Luke 23:48 . Jeremiah 31:19 . Nahum 2:7 . upon . Greek. eis; but all the texts omit. be merciful = be propitiated or reconciled (through the... read more

E.W. Bullinger

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes - Luke 18:14

to = unto. Greek. eis. App-104 . justified. Reckoned as righteous. rather than . The texts read "compared with", Greek. para. App-104 . the other = that one. for , &c. Repeated from Luke 14:11 . Compare Habakkuk 2:4 . read more

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