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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Luke 18:18-30

In these verses we have, I. Christ's discourse with a ruler, that had a good mind to be directed by him in the way to heaven. In which we may observe, 1. It is a blessed sight to see persons of distinction in the world distinguish themselves from others of their rank by their concern about their souls and another life. Luke takes notice of it that he was a ruler. Few of the rulers had any esteem for Christ, but here was one that had; whether a church or state ruler does not appear, but he was... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Luke 18:18-30

18:18-30 A ruler asked Jesus, "Good teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" Jesus said to him, "Why do you call me good? There is none good except one God. You know the commandments--do not commit adultery, do not kill, do not steal, do not bear false witness, honour your father and your mother." He said, "From my youth I have kept all these." When Jesus heard that, he said to him, "You still lack one thing. Sell everything you have and distribute it to the poor, and you will have... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Luke 18:24

And when Jesus saw that he was very sorrowful ,.... As he might, by his looks and gestures; and perceived that he was determined not to part with his possessions, and follow him: he said to his disciples, how hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God ! embrace the Gospel, and submit to the ordinances of it; deny themselves, part with their worldly substance for the cause of Christ, and interest of religion. Riches, which should be a reason for, are often a bar unto... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Luke 18:24

How hardly shall they that have riches, etc. - See the notes on this discourse of our Lord, on Matthew 19:21-30 ; (note), and Mark 10:30 ; (note). read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:15-30

Jesus and the children. The young ruler refuses to give up his riches. The Lord speaks of the reward of them that leave all for his sake. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:15-30

The children of the kingdom. During the progress of the King towards Jerusalem, his personal influence and benediction were greatly valued. It would seem that mothers brought their children to him to be blessed, and ended by producing the very little ones. The disciples thought the line should be drawn somewhere, and so ventured to forbid the anxious mothers, only, however, to receive the significant rebuke from him, "Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:18-25

The ruler who refused the crown. It is a certain ruler, a young man, who accosts our Lord. And the question which he asks represents one of the deepest cravings of the human breast. Is it only in the Gospels that we find this question? It is written into all the religions, into the best of all the philosophies, the poetries, the guesses at truth, which have commanded the thought of the ages, It is as old as human nature, as manifold in its complexion as the human experience, as abiding in... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:24

And when Jesus saw that he was very sorrowful, he said, How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God! The temptations which beset a rich man are so many and so various. The poor, indeed, with all their trials, stand fairer for the kingdom than do their envied richer brothers and sisters. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Luke 18:24

Wealth and piety. Wherein lies the difficulty of a rich man entering the kingdom? This young ruler shrank from parting with his property, but Jesus Christ does not ordinarily ask men of wealth to "sell all that they have and give to the poor." His difficulty, therefore, is not the common one. 1 . It is not that the rich man is not as welcome to the friendship of Christ as the poor man. He does not make distinctions in his invitation, or in his desire that men should come to him. In... read more

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