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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

Christ, having been for some time preaching about in the country, here returns to Capernaum his head-quarters, and makes his appearance there, in hopes that by this time the talk and crowd would be somewhat abated. Now observe, I. The great resort there was to him. Though he was in the house, wither Peter's house, or some lodgings of his own which he had taken, yet people came to him as soon as it was noised that he was in town; they did not stay till he appeared in the synagogue, which they... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Mark 2:7-12

2:7-12 Some of the experts in the law were sitting there, and they were debating within themselves, "How can this fellow speak like this? He is insulting God. Who can forgive sins except one person--God?" Jesus immediately knew in his spirit that this debate was going on in their minds, so he said to them, "Why do you debate thus in your minds? Which is easier--to say to the paralysed man, 'Your sins are forgiven,' or to say, 'Get up, and lift your bed, and walk around'? Just to let you see... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Mark 2:7

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies ?.... They took Christ to be a mere man, and reasoned with themselves, that he must be a blasphemer, in assuming that to himself, which was peculiar to God: they seem astonished at his words, and wonder at his arrogance, and to be filled with indignation and resentment at him; saying, who can forgive sins but God only ? this was a generally received maxim with them, and a very just one. The Chaldee paraphrase of Job 14:4 , runs thus; "who can... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Mark 2:7

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? - See this explained Matthew 9:3 ; (note), etc. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

Christ's authority to pardon. Our Lord's miracles of healing were, upon the surface and obviously, designed to relieve from suffering and to restore to health. They, at the same time, directed the attention of both those benefited, and of spectators, to the supernatural power and to the benevolence of the Divine Physician. But no Christian can fail to see in them a moral significance. Disorders of the body were symbolical of spiritual disease. And the great Healer, who pitied and relieved... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

Cure of the paralytic. I. DIFFICULTIES ARE READILY OVERCOME WHERE THERE IS FAITH . The house was probably a poor one, roofed with mud and shingle. It would be easy, therefore, to dig a hole and obtain entrance in that way. But doing it required a certain amount of ingenuity and effort, which proved that the man and his friends were resolved to get to Jesus and obtain the cure. All this trouble and thoughtfulness was the outcome of faith in Christ. Their boldness was the... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

The paralytic. I. THE PARALYTIC A TYPE OF HELPLESSNESS IN GENERAL . In this case both physical and moral. No malady is serious but that which attacks the freedom of the soul in its seat. II. DIFFICULTIES ARE FOR THE TRIAL OF FAITH . The physical difficulty of getting to Christ's presence we may view as a parable or allegory of deeper moral difficulties. How hard to be a Christian—to reach the truth and live in the light of it! Argument breaks down; many gaps... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

The sick of the palsy: the spiritual and physical healing. The excitement having subsided, Jesus enters again into Capernaum. He, in the house, was teaching, "Pharisees and doctors of the Law sitting by," from all parts. The mighty "power of the Lord was with him to heal," as was made evident before, or as was to be proved by this event. It being "noised that he was in the house, many were gathered together," crowding "about the door." But attention is arrested by the bold deed of four... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:1-12

Parallel passages: Matthew 9:2-8 ; Luke 5:17-26 .— The cure of the paralytic. I. THE POPULARITY OF OUR LORD . After the cure of the leper, recorded at the close of the preceding chapter, our Lord, to avoid tumult or undue excitement on the part of the people, or an unseasonable precipitation of his plans, retired to and remained some short time in unfrequented places; but the crowds kept resorting ( ἤρχοντο , imperfect) to him from all directions. After an interval of... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 2:6-7

The words, Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? in accordance with the altered reading ( βλασφημεῖ for βλασφημίας ), should stand thus: Why doth this man thus speak ? he blasphemeth. It is evident that the scribes, who were secretly amongst themselves finding fault with our Lord's words, understood that, by the use of these words, our Lord was assuming to himself a Divine attribute. And if he had been a mere man; if he had not really been, as he assumed to be, Divine, the... read more

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