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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

See here, I. How humbly Christ was pleased to conceal himself. Never man was so cried up as he was in Galilee, and therefore, to teach us, though not to decline any opportunity of doing good, yet not to be fond of popular applause, he arose from thence, and went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon, where he was little known; and there he entered, not into a synagogue, or place of concourse, but into a private house, and he would have no man to know it; because it was foretold concerning him, He... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Mark 7:24-30

7:24-30 He left there and went away into the regions of Tyre and Sidon. He went into a house and he did not wish anyone to know about it, but he could not be there without people knowing about it. When a woman whose daughter had an unclean spirit heard about him, she immediately came and threw herself at his feet. The woman was a Greek, a Syrophoenician by birth. She asked him to cast the demon out of her daughter. He said to her, "First of all you must let the children eat their fill; it is... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Mark 7:28

And she answered and said unto him, yes, Lord ,.... Agreeing to, and acquiescing in, what he said; which she seemed to have understood, though delivered in a proverbial way; and very appropriately replies, yet the dogs under the table eat of the children's crumbs ; which they leave, or let fall: signifying that she did not envy the blessings of the Jews, or desire any thing might be done injurious to them; only that this favour might be granted her, which she owned she was unworthy of,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

The alien's faith. In quest of repose and retirement, the Lord Jesus often, even during the busiest periods of his ministry withdrew from crowded cities and busy shores to some accessible seclusion. On this occasion he traveled to the borders of Phoenicia, but though so far from his accustomed resorts, he was known and sought and followed. From Tyre and Sidon people had already, attracted by his fame, found their way to the neighborhood of Capernaum, to hear his discourses and to behold... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

The prayer of the Syro-phoenician woman. An atmosphere of publicity about Christ: crowds follow him wherever they hear of his presence, and even in strange regions his fame anticipates him. The many who took advantage of his power to heal are forgotten in the special ease which now presented itself. This may have been the spiritual result of many unsatisfactory cases in which the cure only affected the body; the rumor of them awoke at least one heart to a new sense of spiritual power.... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

The heathen mother. I. THE HEATHEN AND THE JEW . 1 . In general, no relation could be more bitter ; no estrangement more wide. No modem analogy can well enable us to realize this. They were "wide as the poles asunder." 2 . Jesus the Reconciler. In him there is neither Jew nor heathen. This sublime truth was first to be made clear by his own conduct. All truths must be represented in practice if the world is to receive them. Christ did not deal in the sentiment of... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

The Syro-phoenician woman. Now, in prudence, not in fear, Jesus withdraws from the districts under Herod's jurisdiction, where he had created sufficient excitement to expose him to hindrance both by friends and foes. He fain would hide himself in secret. "He entered into a house, and would have no man know it;" but it was unavailing—"he could not be hid." One at least sought him out with an eager intrusiveness which was only justified by the greatness and pressing nature of her need—"a... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:24-30

Parallel passage: Matthew 15:21-28 .— Daughter of a Syro-phoenician woman healed. I. OUR LORD 'S WITHDRAWAL INTO THE REGION OF TYRE AND SIDON , Our Lord's retirement at this time into the region indicated was probably occasioned by a desire to avoid the further attention and inquiries of Herod, and perhaps his presence also there in his tetrarchy, which comprised Galilee and Peraea; while it may have been a symbolic intimation of the mercy in store for, and ere... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Mark 7:28

In this verse there is a slight change of reading, causing a change of rendering; namely, thus: Yea, Lord: even— καὶ instead of καὶ γὰρ the dogs τὰ κυνάρια the little dogs— under the table eat of the children's crumbs . Observe the antithesis: "the children" (the little daughter) sitting at the table; the "little dogs" under the table. It is as though she said, "Give me, most gracious Lord, only a crumb (a small mercy compared with thy greater mercies), the healing... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Mark 7:24-30

See this miracle explained in the notes at Matthew 15:21-28.Mark 7:24Would have no man know it - To avoid the designs of the Pharisees he wished to be retired.Mark 7:26A Greek - The Jews called all persons “Greeks” who were not of their nation. Compare Romans 1:14. The whole world was considered as divided into Jews and Greeks. Though she might not have been strictly a “Greek,” yet she came under this general appellation as a foreigner. read more

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