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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

We have here the parable of the talents committed to three servants; this implies that we are in a state of work and business, as the former implies that we are in a state of expectancy. That showed the necessity of habitual preparation, this of actual diligence in our present work and service. In that we were stirred up to do well for our own souls; in this to lay out ourselves for the glory of God and the good of others. In this parable, 1. The Master is Christ, who is the absolute Owner and... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Matthew 25:14-30

25:14-30 Even so, a man who was going abroad called his servants, and handed over his belongings to them. To one he gave a thousand pounds; to another five hundred pounds; to another two hundred and fifty pounds; to each according to his individual ability. So he went away. Straightway the man who had received the thousand pounds went and worked with them, and made another thousand pounds. In the same way the man who had received the five hundred pounds made another five hundred pounds of... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Matthew 25:21

His Lord said unto him, well done ,.... Gospel ministers do not say so to themselves; they know they can do nothing well of themselves, and when they have done all they can, they own they are but unprofitable servants; they acknowledge all they do is owing to the grace of God, and strength of Christ, and that no praise is due to them; nor do they expect or seek for such eulogies from men: but this is said, to show how acceptable a diligent laborious ministry is to Christ, and to encourage... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Matthew 25:22

He also that had received two talents ,.... A lesser degree of ministerial gifts; and who as he received next to the other, and was the next, who in proportion to what he had received, had traded and gained, he is mentioned in the next: place, as giving in his account; who came and said, Lord, thou deliveredst unto me two talents, behold I have gained two other talents besides them : his account, abating the sum and gains, is given in, in the same form as the other. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

Parable of the talents. (Peculiar to St. Matthew.) Following on the lesson of watchfulness and inward personal preparation just given, this parable enforces the necessity of external work and man's accountability to God for the due use of the special endowments which he has received. The former was concerned chiefly with the contemplative life, the waiting virgins; this chiefly with the active, the working servant; though, in fact, both states combine more or less in the good Christian, and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

The parable of the talents. I. THE MASTER AND HIS SERVANTS . 1 . The Master ' s departure. This parable is the complement of the last. The two together cover both sides of the Christian life—the contemplative and the active. The burning lamp represents the life of faith and worship kindled by the presence of the Holy Spirit. The trading represents the outward life of active work for Christ. Under all ordinary circumstances the two must be combined. A living faith cannot... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

The parable of the talents. This parable is naturally associated with that of the ten virgins. In both we have the time for preparation, the crisis of judgment, the differences of conduct, and subsequent results. But this second parable treats of higher responsibilities and graver issues. Here we have a specific trust; the duty is more than watching, it is diligent working; and the rewards and punishments are proportionately greater. We pass from the joys of the kingdom and the possibility... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

The parable of the talents. There are three parables which illustrate the relation of work and wages in the kingdom of heaven—the labourers in the vineyard, the pounds, and the talents. What this parable chiefly illustrates is that men are rewarded, not solely in proportion to the quantity of work produced, but that their ability and the means at their disposal are taken into account. And in order that this life be a fair field for the test of fidelity, two or three things are requisite, and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:14-30

The talents. This, like the preceding parable, refers immediately to the professed followers of Christ. It probably has a special, though certainly not exclusive, application to ministers and those distinguished by office in the Churches. We have to consider— I. THE TALENTS . 1 . These are not the natural faculties. 2 . They are the gifts of grace and providence. (a) the ordinary; (b) the extraordinary. There is a manifestation of the Spirit given to every man... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 25:21

Well done ( εὖ ), thou good and faithful servant. He is praised, not for success, but for being "good," i.e. kind and merciful and honest in exercising the trust for others' benefit; and "faithful," true to his master's interests, not idle or inactive, but keeping one object always before him, steadily aiming at fidelity. Some regard the words as a commendation of the servant's works and faith, but this is not the primary meaning according to the context. Over a few things. The... read more

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