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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Matthew 26:69-75

We have here the story of Peter's denying his Master, and it comes in as a part of Christ's sufferings. Our Lord Jesus was now in the High Priest's hall, not to be tried, but baited rather; and then it would have been some comfort to him to see his friends near him. But we do not find any friend he had about the court, save Peter only, and it would have been better if he had been at a distance. Observe how he fell, and how he got up again by repentance. I. His sin, which is here impartially... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Matthew 26:70

But he denied before them all ,.... Which was a very great aggravation of his sin; for, as it is to a man's commendation to profess a good profession of Christ before many witnesses, so it is to his disgrace, and is resented by Christ, to deny him before men: he did not deny that Christ was God, or the Son of God, or that he was come in the flesh, or that Jesus was the Christ, or that he was the only Saviour of sinners; but that he was with him, or one of his disciples, saying, I know not... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Matthew 26:70

But he denied before them all - So the evil principle gains ground. Before, he followed at a distance, now he denies; this is the second gradation in his fall. read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Matthew 26:70

Verse 70 70.But he denied before them all. This circumstance aggravates the criminality of Peter, that, in denying his Master, he did not even dread a multitude of witnesses. (236) And the Spirit intended expressly to state this, that even the presence of men may excite us to hold fast the confession of faith. For if we deny Christ before the weak, they are shaken by our example, and give way; and thus we destroy as many souls as we can; but if, in presence of those who wickedly despise God and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:57-75

The palace of Caiaphas. I. THE PRELIMINARY TRIAL . 1. The meeting of the Sanhedrin. St. John tells us that our Lord was led first before Annas, for a hasty informal examination. Perhaps it was thought that the astute Annas, with that snake-like cunning which was attributed to him, might elicit something which might tell against the Prisoner. But the craft of the old high priest and the brutality of his officers were alike unavailing; and the Lord was sent to Caiaphas. The... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:69-75

The three denials of St. Peter. ( Mark 14:66-72 ; Luke 22:55-62 ; John 18:17 , John 18:18 , John 18:25-27 .) read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:69-75

St. Peter denying his Lord. It says much for the veracity of the Gospel narratives that the evangelists have not shrunk from recording an incident which is to the shame of the chief of the apostles. And yet we may be sure that the charity which covers a multitude of sins would have buried this sad story in eternal oblivion if it had not been full of important lessons for all ages. These things are not written for Peter's shame, but for our instruction. No doubt the first record of the story... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:69-75

Peter's denial of Jesus. Describe the scene—the arrangement of the palace, which admitted of Jesus in the judgment hall seeing what was passing in the court, the rooms being built round a court open to the sky. Describe also the three denials. I. SINS ARISE FROM UNSUSPECTED QUALITIES IN US . Peter, the bold, venturesome, straightforward disciple, fell by cowardice and lying; as Moses the meek by anger, and Solomon the wise by folly. Often our most flagrant transgressions... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:69-75

Sin in sequence. From the trial of Jesus before the council the evangelist turns to the trial of Peter's faith. How striking is the contrast! Jesus, forsaken of his friends, and unjustly condemned and cruelly treated by his enemies, betrays no sign of fear or resentment, while Peter, with his Master's exalted example before him, shrinks from the slightest glance of recognition. The history of Peter's fall remarkably illustrates the principle of sequence in sits. We are forcibly reminded— ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 26:70

He denied before them all. This was the first batch of accusations and denials. The equivocal denial was made vehemently and openly, so that all around heard it. It does not seem that he would have incurred any danger if he had boldly confessed his discipleship, so that this renunciation was gratuitous and unnecessary. I know not what thou sayest. This is virtually a denial of the allegation made, though in an indirect and evasive form, implying, "I do not know what you are alluding to." read more

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