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John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Matthew 5:13

Verse 13 Matthew 5:13.Ye are the salt of the earth. What belongs to doctrine is applied to the persons to whom the administration of it has been committed. When Christ calls the apostles the salt of the earth, he means, that it is their office to salt the earth: because men have nothing in them but what is tasteless, till they have been seasoned with the salt of heavenly doctrine. After having reminded them to what they are called, he pronounces against them a heavy and dreadful judgment, if... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Matthew 5:14

Verse 14 Matthew 5:14Ye are the light of the world We are all the children of light, after having been enlightened by faith, and are commanded to carry in our hands “burning lamps,” (that we may not wander in darkness,) and even to point out to others the way of life, (Luke 12:35.) But, as the preaching of the Gospel was committed to the apostles above others, and is now committed to the pastors of the Church, this designation is given to them, in a peculiar manner, by Christ. “They are placed... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Matthew 5:16

Verse 16 16.Let your light shine before men After having taught the apostles that, in consequence of the rank in which they are placed, both their vices and their virtues are better known for a good or bad example, he now enjoins them so to regulate their life, as to excite all to glorify God. That they may see your good works: for, as Paul tells us, believers must, “provide for honest things, not only in the sight of God, but also in the sight of men,” (2 Corinthians 8:21.) The command,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:1-16

The sermon on the mount. The first part of the sermon: the law of the kingdom of heaven. I. THE BEATITUDES . 1 . The first Beatitude. 2 . The second Beatitude. (a) It seems a paradox. Sorrow and joy are opposed to one another; but the Lord says that there is a sorrow which is blessed. Life is full of sorrows. There is more sorrow in the world than joy, more pain than pleasure. Outward sorrows are blessed if they are meekly borne, in patience and in trustful faith. When... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:11-16

Some critics ( e.g. Godet, Weiss) think that Matthew 5:13-16 are no part of the original sermon, but only an interweaving of sayings which were originally spoken at other times. This is possible, but external evidence exists only in the case of Matthew 5:13 and Matthew 5:15 (for Matthew 5:14 and Matthew 5:16 are peculiar to Matthew); and even in the ease of these verses it is by no means clear ( vide infra ) that the occasions on which, according to the other Gospels, the... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:13

Ye are the salt , etc.. Weiss thinks that St. Luke gives it in its original context; that St. Matthew is right in interpreting it as of special reference to the disciples; and that St. Mark applies it the most freely. It may, indeed, be that its position here is only the result of the inspired guidance of the evangelist; but, on the whole, it seems more probable that so natural a figure was used more than once by our Lord, and that he really spoke these words in his sermon on the mount, as... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:13-14

Salt and light. Christ regards his people as the salt of the earth and as the light of the world. In both characters they have a mission to others. The Church exists for the sake of the world. She has a large vocation; the whole earth is the field of her work, and there she is to labour not for her own ends, but to benefit mankind. How grievous is the perversion of those who exactly reverse the position of Christ, and behave as though the world only existed for the benefit of the Church! ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:13-16

The startling salutation. The announcements of the Beatitudes were necessarily startling in their matter, even when considered as delivered simply generally, whether the world or any in it hear or forbear. They breathed a spirit and plainly laid down views with which those of the world were so utterly at variance. The estrangement was almost absolute, and amounted to the rigour of alienation. Notice, then, in these words— I. THE ASSISTANCE THEY OFFER TO THE DISCIPLES ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 5:13-16

Sermon on the mount: 2. Influence of Christians: salt and light. Our Lord assured his disciples that very bad treatment in this life might only be the prelude to eternal happiness. He is in the position of a general who is launching his men on an enterprise which will try them to the utmost. So he not only affirms that they will be rewarded, but reminds them how much depends on them. If you faint, what hope is there for the world? He speaks of their relation to the world under two... read more

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