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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Matthew 7:7-11

Our Saviour, in the foregoing chapter, had spoken of prayer as a commanded duty, by which God is honoured, and which, if done aright, shall be rewarded; here he speaks of it as the appointed means of obtaining what we need, especially grace to obey the precepts he had given, some of which are so displeasing to flesh and blood. I. Here is a precept in three words to the same purport, Ask, Seek, Knock (Matt. 7:7); that is, in one word, ?Pray; pray often; pray with sincerity and seriousness;... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Matthew 7:7-11

7:7-11 Keep on asking, and it will be given you; Keep on seeking, and you will find; Keep on knocking, and it will be opened to you. For everyone that asks receives; And he who seeks finds; And to him who knocks it will be opened. What man is there, who, if his son will ask him for bread, will give him a stone? Or, if he will ask for a fish, will he give him a serpent? If, then, you, who are grudging, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Matthew 7:10

Or if he ask a fish, will he give him a serpent? Which is somewhat like a fish, especially an eel. Fish and bread are mentioned, because these were common food; see Mark 6:41 John 21:13 and particularly in Galilee, a fish country, where Christ now was, and from whence he had called his disciples, who were fishermen. In Luke 11:12 it is added, "or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion?" which is used, as the rest, to show the absurdity and inhumanity of such conduct; and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:1-12

(2) As anxiety about the things of this life hinders us Godwards ( Matthew 6:19-34 ), so does censoriousness manwards ( Matthew 7:1-12 ), our Lord thus tacitly opposing two typically Jewish faults. Censoriousness—the personal danger of having it ( Matthew 7:1 , Matthew 7:2 ), its seriousness as a sign of ignorance and as a hindrance to spiritual vision ( Matthew 7:3-5 ), even though there must be a recognition of great moral differences ( Matthew 7:6 ). Grace to overcome it... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:1-12

Sermon on the mount: 6. Against judging others. This "Judge not, that ye be not judged," comes in unexpectedly, and seems out of its place. But the superficial, ostentatious righteousness which our Lord has been exposing betrays itself in nothing more certainly than in censoriousness. To sigh and shake the head over a sinful world is one of the easiest roads to a reputation for sanctity. The reasons our Lord gives for refraining from judging others are two. 1 . If we judge harshly and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:1-20

Various practical rules issuing out of the central duty of self-consecration. I. CONDUCT TOWARDS OTHERS . 1 . Gentleness in our estimate of the lives of others. The hypocrites trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others; they made an ostentatious display of their own supposed good deeds, and passed stern judgments on their neighbours. The righteousness of Christ's disciples must exceed that of the Pharisees in both respects. Indeed, Christ's words must not... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:7-11

Ask , and it shall be given you , etc. Parallel passage: Luke 11:9-13 . Nearly verbally identical, but in the son's request, reads " egg " and " scorpion " for "bread" and "stone," and reverses the order of the sentences. In Luke the verses are closely connected ("and I say unto you") with the parable of the friend at midnight, which itself immediately follows the Lord's Prayer. It seems probable that, as with the Lord's Prayer ( Luke 6:9-13 , note), so with these... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:7-11

Encouragements for prayer. Jesus is revealing the Fatherhood of God, and now he is showing how that great truth is the basis of faith, and, in particular, the ground for confidence in prayer. I. THE CALL TO PRAYER . 1 . Thrice repeated. This threefold invitation shows us 2 . In varied forms. 3 . With promise of success. Prayer is more than confiding in God. It is not a voice crying in the dark for its own relief, and satisfied without any reply. It must be... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:7-12

Prayer. From the subject of giving our Lord turns to that of asking. The text instructs us in— I. THE NATURE OF PRAYER . 1 . It is asking. 2 . It is seeking. 3 . It is knocking. II. THE ENCOURAGEMENT TO PRAY . 1 . In the promises of God. 2 . In the character of the promises. III. THE CONDITIONS OF PRAYER . 1 . These are given in the promises. 2 . They are embodied in the golden rule. 3 . Apply this rule. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Matthew 7:9-10

Or what man is there of you , etc.? Or. Is not what I say true? or—if you think not—what man of you yourselves would act otherwise towards his own son? Our Lord appeals to the experience and natural feelings of his hearers themselves to emphasize the readiness of the Father—"your Father," whose nature you share, and from whom you derive your feelings of fatherhood ( Ephesians 3:15 )—to grant the prayers of his children. Observe: read more

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