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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 104:10-18

Having given glory to God as the powerful protector of this earth, in saving it from being deluged, here he comes to acknowledge him as its bountiful benefactor, who provides conveniences for all the creatures. I. He provides fresh water for their drink: He sends the springs into the valleys, Ps. 104:10. There is water enough indeed in the sea, that is, enough to drown us, but not one drop to refresh us, be we ever so thirsty?it is all so salt; and therefore God has graciously provided water... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 104:18

The high hills are a refuge for the wild goats ,.... Who have their name in Hebrew F4 יעלים ab עלה Buxtorf. Lexic. fol. 322. from their climbing and ascending them. What we commonly call "a wild goose chase" should be expressed "a wild goat's chase"; for not geese, but goats, are chased; and when they are, they flee to the hills for refuge. Hence they are sometimes called the wild goats of the rocks, Job 39:1 , and sometimes the rocks are called from them the rocks of wild goats,... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 104:18

The high hills are a refuge - The barren tops of the highest hills, and the craggy abrupt precipices of the most stupendous rocks, are not without their uses: they afford protection, refuge, and food, for creatures whose dispositions and habits are suited to such places; and thus no part of the creation is useless. The creatures who are their inhabitants are necessary links in the great chain of animated beings, and show the wisdom and providence of God. For a description of the covey, see... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 104:1-35

The greatness of God. This psalm, charged with the truest poetry, sings of the greatness of God ( Psalms 104:1 ) and of the heritage of man. The subjects are inseparably mingled. Of the former we have suggested to us - I. HIS GLORY . ( Psalms 104:1 , Psalms 104:2 , Psalms 104:31 .) II. HIS POWER . ( Psalms 104:3-9 .) The winds are his messengers; the fire is his servant; the clouds are his chariot; the waters flee at his command; the ocean stays at the bound he... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 104:1-35

The heritage of man. The psalmist sings of the greatness of God ( supra ) , and also of the fair heritage bestowed upon us. This includes— I. SUFFICIENCY AND VARIETY OF FOOD . "These [all the living creatures, including man, that have been specified] wait on thee, that thou mayest give them their food," etc. ( Psalms 104:27 ); and the "herb" ( Psalms 104:14 ), for the service of man, stands for all the variety of fruits and vegetables with which our need is met and... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 104:1-35

God's love for living creatures. This psalm celebrates and proves it. For, see— I. HE HAS PLACED THEM EVERYWHERE . The sea, the air, the land, all teem with it, as this psalm tells. And the lower life points to the higher, and proclaims that when God's will is done, that, too, shall fill earth and heaven. II. HE HAS ABUNDANTLY PROVIDED FOR THEM . Food, habitation, refuge ( Psalms 104:16-18 ). And Christ came, that we might have life, and have it more... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 104:5-18

The psalm of creation: the third day. On all this the preacher will compare Milton's magnificent lines ('Paradise Lost'). The opening verse of this section was laid hold of by those who opposed Galileo, as with equal reasonableness or unreasonableness like verses are laid hold of in like controversies now—as utterly contradicting the conclusions to which his investigations had led him. Ever since there has been a clearer perception that the poetry of the Bible is poetry, and is to be... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 104:18

The high hills are a refuge for the wild goats. Even the desolate ranges of the higher mountains are designed by God for the good of his creatures. They furnish a refuge for the ibex, or wild goat, when the hunter presses ca him; and, if they cannot give him food, give him safety. And the rocks for the conies; rather, for the marmots. Marmots still inhabit Palestine, though they are rarely seen; "conies," i.e. rabbits do not. The marmots are "a feeble folk, that make their houses in... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Psalms 104:18

The high hills are a refuge for the wild goats - Still keeping up the description of animated nature - the carrying out of the work of creation. The idea is, that nature is full of life. Even the most inaccessible places - the rocks - the high hills - have their inhabitants. Where man cannot climb or dwell, there are abodes of animals which God has made to dwell there, and which find there a refuge - a shelter - a home. On the word used here, and rendered “wild goats,” see the notes at Job... read more

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