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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 105:25-45

After the history of the patriarchs follows here the history of the people of Israel, when they grew into a nation. I. Their affliction in Egypt (Ps. 105:25): He turned the heart of the Egyptians, who had protected them, to hate them and deal subtilely with them. God's goodness to his people exasperated the Egyptians against them; and, though their old antipathy to the Hebrews (which we read of Gen. 43:32; 46:34) was laid asleep for a while, yet now it revived with more violence than ever:... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 105:25

He turned their heart to hate his people ,.... Whom before they loved and esteemed: when Pharaoh and his servants heard of Joseph's father and brethren, they were greatly pleased, and invited them into Egypt; and, when come, placed them in the land of Goshen; but when a new king arose, and a new generation, which knew not Joseph, the hearts of these were turned to hate them. This is said to be of the Lord: not that he put any hatred into them, there was no need of that; there is enough of... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 105:25

He turned their heart - " Their heart was turned." So the Syriac and Arabic. After befriending the Hebrews on Joseph's account, to whom they were so deeply indebted, finding them to multiply greatly in the land, and at last to become more powerful than the Egyptians themselves, they turned their attention to the adoption of measures, in order to prevent the Hebrews from possessing themselves of the government of the whole land; they curtailed them of their privileges, and endeavored to... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 105:25

Verse 25 25.He turned their heart, so that they hated his people The Egyptians, though at first kind and courteous hosts to the Israelites, became afterwards cruel enemies; and this also the prophet ascribes to the counsel of God. They were undoubtedly driven to this by a perverse and malignant spirit, by pride and covetousness; but still such a thing did not happen without the providence of God, who in an incomprehensible manner so accomplishes his work in the reprobate, as that he brings... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 105:1-45

The "introduction" forms a strophe by itself. It is usual to divide the historical portion into strophes; but this can only be done arbitrarily, there being no really marked divisions. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 105:1-45

The testimony of history. God reveals himself in many ways; of these one is found in human history. All history may be studied, that we may understand his Divine thought and purpose; but more especially sacred history, his dealings with his ancient people. The psalmist is continually returning to this as a source of striking and convincing illustration. Among other lessons brought out by this psalm are the following:— I. HIS FAITHFULNESS . ( Psalms 105:8-11 , Psalms 105:42-44 ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 105:1-45

He watching over Israel slumbers not nor sleeps. I. A BLESSED RETROSPECT . 1 . He knows it is blessed, because, ere the psalmist sets it down, he summons, in intensely earnest, varied, and emphatic wag, all people to give thanks unto the Lord. 2 . And he tells them wherefore they should hearken to his Word— because the Lord "hath remembered his covenant forever," etc. ( Psalms 105:8 ). 3 . Then comes the covenant history. He tells what the covenant was ( Psalms... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 105:23-25

Disclplinary experience. It is singular that in Psalms 105:25 God should be spoken of as the agent in turning the hearts of the Egyptians to hate his people. Some would soften the expression, and make it mean only that God suffered the hostility arising from the increase of the people. But there is no difficulty when once we see that God's dealings with us are disciplinary; that he uses the ordinary events of life for his disciplinary purposes, and that in a poem he may be said to... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 105:25

He turned their heart to hate his people. Not by direct action on their heart, but by prospering Israel until their jealousy was stirred. To deal subtilly with his servants (comp. Exodus 1:10 ). read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Psalms 105:25

He turned their heart to hate his people - God turned their heart. That is, He so ordered things that they became the enemies of his people, and made it necessary that they should be removed into another land. It is not said that God did this by his direct “power;” or that he “compelled” them to hate his people; or that he in any way interfered with their “will;” or that he regarded this “as a good” in itself; or that he “approved” of it: but this is said in accordance with the usual... read more

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