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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 109:6-20

David here fastens upon some one particular person that was worse than the rest of his enemies, and the ringleader of them, and in a devout and pious manner, not from a principle of malice and revenge, but in a holy zeal for God and against sin and with an eye to the enemies of Christ, particularly Judas who betrayed him, whose sin was greater than Pilate's that condemned him (John 19:11), he imprecates and predicts his destruction, foresees and pronounces him completely miserable, and such a... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 109:9

Let his children be fatherless, and his wife a widow. This sometimes is the case of good men, who leave widows and fatherless children, whom the Lord shows mercy to; being the Father of the fatherless, and the Judge of the widow, Psalm 68:5 , but sometimes it is threatened and comes as a judgment, when the Lord shows no mercy and favour to them, Exodus 22:24 . And this is the case here, which very probably was literally fulfilled in Judas, who might have a wife and children; since it... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 109:9

Let his children be fatherless, etc. - It is said that Judas was a married man, against whom this verse, as well as the preceding is supposed to be spoken; and that it was to support them that he stole from the bag in which the property of the apostles was put, and of which he was the treasurer. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:1-31

Explanation, warning, encouragement. This psalm of David contains— I. AN EXPLANATION TO BE SOUGHT . How came these strong imprecations to be used by the servant of the Lord? Are they worthy to find a place in the pages of Holy Scripture? Two things, at least, have to be considered in defense of them. 1. David identifies his own cause with that of God, and therefore his own enemies with God's. He is animated by the spirit which breathes in the words, "Do not I hate them... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:1-31

The dreadful psalm. It is by no means easy to imagine the whole nation of Israel singing such dreadful imprecations as those contained in Psalms 109:6-19 . "Thousands of God's people," says Mr. Spurgeon, "are perplexed by it." Not a few would like to be rid of it altogether. And the explanation given by many of the old commentators, that these fearful curses are those of the Lord Jesus Christ on Judas, who betrayed him, has only made the difficulties connected with this psalm ever so... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:1-31

Awful Imprecations This is a psalm of the most awful imprecations, in which the writer unrestminedly pours forth the fiercest hatred of his enemy, and pleads with God to load him with the most dreadful curses. He justifies his vindictive spirit by pleading that his enemy had fought against him without a cause; had rewarded his good with evil, and his love with hatred. He says he will give himself unto prayer; but the words which follow breathe a spirit such as we wonder that a man dare... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:6-15

The imprecatory portion of the psalm now begins. It is no doubt true to say, with Tholuck, that "no passion is discernible in the imprecations, dreadful as they are." Clearly the writer is not moved by personal feelings of hostility, but by a spirit of justice, and an intense abhorrence of sin. He delivers a calm judicial sentence. Still, the spirit of Christian love must ever shrink from such utterances, which belong to an earlier and less perfect dispensation (comp. Luke 9:51-56 ). read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:9

Let his children be fatherless, and his wife a widow . Necessary consequences of his own condemnation to death. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 109:9-10

The vicarious feature in judgments. "Let his children be orphans, and his wife a widow." There are few Bible difficulties more perplexing than that which is created by the fact, that a man's punishments are recognized as righteously affecting, not himself only, but also his children, and those dependent on him. We naturally resist this, and say, "Every man ought to bear his own burden," and a man's punishment should be limited to himself. It is not so; it never has been so; it never can... read more

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