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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 110:1-4

Some have called this psalm David's creed, almost all the articles of the Christian faith being found in it; the title calls it David's psalm, for in the believing foresight of the Messiah he both praised God and solaced himself, much more may we, in singing it, to whom that is fulfilled, and therefore more clearly revealed, which is here foretold. Glorious things are here spoken of Christ, and such as oblige us to consider how great he is. I. That he is David's Lord. We must take special... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 110:3

Thy people shall be willing in the day of that power ..... Or, in the day of thine army F19 ביום חילך "in die exercitus tui", Munster, Vatablus, Piscator, Gejerus; so Ainsworth; "quum educes tuas copias", Tigurine version; "die copiarum tuarum", Junius & Tremellius. . When thou musterest thy forces, sendest forth thy generals, the apostles and ministers of the word, in the first times of the Gospel; when Christ went forth working with them, and their ministry was attended with... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 110:3

Thy people shall be willing in the day of thy power - This verse has been wofully perverted. It has been supposed to point out the irresistible operation of the grace of God on the souls of the elect, thereby making them willing to receive Christ as their Savior. Now, whether this doctrine be true or false it is not in this text, nor can it receive the smallest countenance from it. There has been much spoken against the doctrine of what is called free will by persons who seem not to have... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 110:3

Verse 3 3Thy people shall come (324) In this verse the Psalmist sets forth the honors of Christ’s kingdom in relation to the number of his subjects, and their prompt and cheerful obedience to his commands. The Hebrew term, which he employs, frequently denotes voluntary oblations; but, in the present case, it refers to the chosen people, those who are truly Christ’s flock; declaring that they shall be a willing people, spontaneously and cheerfully consecrating themselves to his service. At the... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

There seem to be no sufficient grounds for rejecting the traditional views of the authorship and the interpretation. The psalm belongs to the same class as Psalm it. It is wholly Messianic. David has had revelations made to him concerning the kingdom, the priesthood, and the ultimate victory of the Messiah over the entire power of evil. In a grand burst of song, rough and rugged, no doubt, but full of energy and genius, he addresses Messiah, and sets forth his praise and glory, the mighty... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

The victorious King. New Testament references leave no doubt as to the Messianic character of this psalm. "The image of a warrior destroying his foes may seem a strange representation of the establishment upon earth of Christ's spiritual dominion. But David described Messiah's victory over his enemies by images familiar to him as a warrior; so Ezekiel drew his images out of the forms of the Assyrian world." Here, in prophetic vision, we see Christ our Lord— I. HOLDING THE MOST ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

Christ the Divine King and Priest. Many difficulties in the interpretation of this psalm. Let us accept it as, in the main, a prophecy of the Jewish Messiah. Then we find the two main features of it fulfilled in the Christ of history. I. HE HAS BEEN RAISED TO THE DIVINE THRONE OF KINGLY POWER . ( Psalms 110:1-3 .) 1. The power by which he subdues the world is spiritual and Divine . His cross "the rod of his strength." 2. His servants are willing... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:3

Thy people shall be willing in the day of thy power. In the full sense of the word, Messiah can only rule over "willing" hearts. In the day of his power, his people will offer themselves gladly to be his soldiers and servants, and flock to his banner, as the Israelites to that of Deborah and Barak, when "the people willingly offered themselves" ( 5:2 , 5:9 ; comp. Isaiah 49:18-23 ; Isaiah 60:1-5 ; Isaiah 66:19-23 ). In the beauties of holiness . At once warriors and saints,... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:3

The day of Christ's power. Luther calls this psalm "the true high main psalm of our beloved Lord Jesus Christ." Our Lord himself attests that it is inspired of the Holy Ghost, and there is no other Scripture in the Old Testament that is so frequently quoted in the New. The occasion of the psalm seems to have been the great festival of the bringing up of the ark of God from the house of Obed-Edom to Jerusalem. On that day David assumed the double function of priest and king, for he was... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:3

The power of recognizing power. "The people shall be willing in the day of thy power." Power to submit, power to accept, power to respond, power to offer allegiance, come to the people when they recognize Messiah's power. Illustrated on the Day of Pentecost, when Messiah's power was so convincingly displayed. "They then that received Peter's words were baptized; and there were added unto them in that day about three thousand souls." In common history and common life, the principle is seen... read more

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