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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 21:1-6

David here speaks for himself in the first place, professing that his joy was in God's strength and in his salvation, and not in the strength or success of his armies. He also directs his subjects herein to rejoice with him, and to give God all the glory of the victories he had obtained; and all with an eye to Christ, of whose triumphs over the powers of darkness David's victories were but shadows. 1. They here congratulate the king on his joys and concur with him in them Ps. 21:1: ?The king... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 21:2

Thou hast given him his heart's desire ,.... Which the church had prayed for in Psalm 20:4 ; whatever Christ's heart desired, or his lips requested, has been given him; and hast not withholden the request of his lips . Whatever he asked in the council and covenant of peace was granted; he asked for all the elect, as his spouse and bride; these were the desire of his heart and eyes, and they were given him; he asked for all the blessings of grace for them, and all grace was given to... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 21:2

Thou hast given him his heart's desire - This seems to refer to the prayers offered in the preceding Psalm; see especially Psalm 21:1-4 . read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 21:1-13

A royal thanksgiving for answers to prayer. (For a day of national thanksgiving.) We fail to see, in the structure of this psalm, sufficient indications of its being the counterpart of the preceding one, to lead us to call it a Te Deum , to be sung on returning from battle as victor. It would equally well suit other occasions on which the grateful hearts of king and people desired to render praises in the house of God for mercies received; e.g. Psalms 21:4 : would be equally... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 21:1-13

Let the children of Zion be joyful in their King. This psalm concerns the king. But the question is which king? It may have been David. There is much that might apply to him. Perhaps on his recovery from some sickness, or on his return from some signal victory over his enemies, or on the occasion of his birthday or some great anniversary, David and his people may have rejoiced before the Lord with the voice of joy and praise. But a greater than David is here. If the psalm in part is true... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 21:1-13

Thanksgiving for prayer answered. Close connection between this and the previous psalm—that a prayer for the king; this a thanksgiving that the prayer has been answered. The people speak to God ( Psalms 21:1-7 ); then ( Psalms 21:8-12 ) they speak to the king; then in Psalms 21:13 they speak again to God. The occasion of the psalm has been disputed. Some think it is a birthday ode; some, a coronation hymn; and others, a thanksgiving for victory in battle. Let us take it first— I. ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 21:2

Thou hast given him his heart' s desire (comp. Psalms 20:4 , "Grant thee according to thine own heart"). And hast not withholden the request of his lips. "Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh." The deliverance from his enemies, which David had earnestly desired in his heart, he had also devoutly requested with his lips ( Psalms 20:1 , Psalms 20:5 ). Selah . The pause here may have been for the presentation of a thank-offering. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 21:2

The triumph of victory. "Thou hast given him his heart' s desire." We seem to hear in this psalm the trumpets and harps and shawms of the temple, and jubilant voices of Levites praising God for some great victory. Joy-bells are rung and Te Deum laudamus chanted because the king has come home in triumph. The psalm is closely connected with the preceding one. There we see the king going forth to war, consecrating his banner and trusting his cause to God. The Church prays, "The Lord hear... read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Psalms 21:2

Thou hast given him his heart’s desire - See the notes at Psalms 20:4. This had been the prayer of the people that God would “grant him according to his own heart, and fulfil all his counsel,” and this desire had now been granted. All that had been wished; all that had been prayed for by himself or by the people, had been granted.And hast not withholden - Hast not denied or refused.The request of his lips - The request, or the desire which his lips had uttered. The meaning is, that his... read more

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