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Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments - Psalms 73:15

Psalms 73:15. If I say, I will speak thus I will give sentence for the ungodly in this manner. I should offend against the generation of thy children By grieving, discouraging, and condemning them, and by tempting them to revolt from thee and thy service. By the generation of God’s children must be understood all true believers; those who have undertaken the service of God, and entered into covenant with him; part of which covenant and profession is to believe in God’s providence; which,... read more

Donald C. Fleming

Bridgeway Bible Commentary - Psalms 73:1-28

Psalms 73:0 Why do the wicked prosper?Asaph had a problem that almost caused him to give up the life of devotion to God. If God was a God of goodness who helped the righteous and opposed the wicked, why did worthless people prosper while Asaph suffered want (1-3)?It seemed to Asaph that the wicked enjoyed lives of ease and plenty, then died peacefully without suffering. Yet their lives had been characterized by pride, cruelty, greed, trickery, scorn, oppression and boasting (4-9). Some of the... read more

E.W. Bullinger

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes - Psalms 73:15

Behold. Figure of speech Asterismos. offend = deal treacherously. Hebrew. bagad. children = sons. read more

James Burton Coffman

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible - Psalms 73:15

"If I had said, I will speak thus;Behold I had dealt treacherously with the generation of thy children.When I thought how I might know this,It was too painful for me;Until I went into the sanctuary of God,And considered their latter end.Surely thou settest them in slippery places:Thou castest them down to destruction.""If I had said, ..." (Psalms 73:15). No, he did not speak the sinful thoughts that Satan whispered to him. For him to have done so would have been treachery in the sight of... read more

Thomas Coke

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible - Psalms 73:15

Psalms 73:15. If I say, I will speak thus, &c.— Reckon or reason thus:—I should offend against the generation of thy children; i.e. "I should give the lie to the history of our forefathers." See Peters, and the first note. Others, by the generation of God's children, understand all true believers: those who have undertaken the service of God, and entered into covenant with him: part of which covenant and profession is, to believe in God's Providence: which therefore to deny, question, or... read more

Robert Jamieson; A. R. Fausset; David Brown

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Psalms 73:15

15. Freed from idiomatic phrases, this verse expresses a supposition, as, "Had I thus spoken, I should," &c., intimating that he had kept his troubles to himself. generation of thy children—Thy people (1 John 3:1). offend—literally, "deceive, mislead." read more

Thomas Constable

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable - Psalms 73:1-28

III. BOOK 3: CHS. 73-89A man or men named Asaph wrote 11 of the psalms in this book (Psalms 73-83). Other writers were the sons of Korah (Psalms 84-85, 87), David (Psalms 86), Heman (Psalms 88), and Ethan (Psalms 89). Asaph, Heman, and Ethan were musicians from the tribe of Levi who were contemporaries of David. Book 3 of the Psalter has been called its "dark book." [Note: Waltke, p. 886.] Psalms 73In this psalm, Asaph related his inner mental struggle when he compared his life, as one... read more

Thomas Constable

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable - Psalms 73:15-20

The present condition of the wicked tends to make the godly question the wisdom of their strong commitment to the Lord. However, the future condition of those who disregard God’s will now helped Asaph remain loyal to Yahweh.Had he proclaimed his former doubts publicly, he would have misled those who heard him because he was not considering all the facts. It was only when he viewed life in the light of God’s revelation that he regained a proper perspective. Sitting in the sanctuary and... read more

Thomas Constable

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable - Psalms 73:15-28

2. The future destiny of the wicked and the righteous 73:15-28 read more

John Dummelow

John Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 73:1-28

This, like Psalms 37, 49, and the book of Job, deals with the perplexing problempresented to thoughtful minds by the prosperity of the wicked and the sufferings of the righteous. The Psalmist has been deeply exercised by this question (Psalms 73:2-14), and after struggling with doubt (Psalms 73:15-16) has learned in the sanctuary of God to understand the end of the wicked (Psalms 73:17-20), and to repent of his own unbelieving thoughts (Psalms 73:21-22). He has found rest in the conviction that... read more

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