Read & Study the Bible Online - Bible Portal
Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Romans 3:19-31

From all this Paul infers that it is in vain to look for justification by the works of the law, and that it is to be had only by faith, which is the point he has been all along proving, from Rom. 1:17; and which he lays down (Rom. 3:28) as the summary of his discourse, with a quod erat demonstrandum?which was to be demonstrated. We conclude that a man is justified by faith, without the deeds of the law; not by the deeds of the first law of pure innocence, which left no room for repentance, nor... read more

William Barclay

William Barclay's Daily Study Bible - Romans 3:19-26

3:19-26 We know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are within the law, and the function of the law is that every mouth should be silenced and that the whole world should be known to be liable to the judgment of God, because no one will ever get into a right relationship with God by doing the works which the law lays down. What does come through the law is a full awareness of sin. But now a way to a right relationship to God lies open before us quite apart from the law, and it is... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Romans 3:24

Being justified freely by his grace ,.... The matter of justification is before expressed, and the persons that share in this blessing are described; here the several causes of it are mentioned. The moving cause of it is the free grace of God; for by "the grace of God" here, is not meant the Gospel, or what some men call the terms of the Gospel, and the constitution of it; nor the grace of God infused into the heart; but the free love and favour of God, as it is in his heart; which is... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Romans 3:25

Whom God had set forth to be a propitiation ,.... Redemption by Christ is here further explained, by his being "a propitiation": which word may design either Christ the propitiator, the author of peace and reconciliation; or the propitiatory sacrifice, by which he is so; and both in allusion to the mercy seat, which was a type of him as such. The apostle here uses the same word, which the Septuagint often render כפרת "the mercy seat", by; and Philo the Jew calls it by the same name, and... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Romans 3:24

Being justified freely by his grace - So far from being able to attain the glory of God by their obedience, they are all guilty: and, to be saved, must be freely pardoned by God's grace; which is shown to them who believe, through the redemption, απολυτρωσεως , the ransom price, which is in the sacrifice of Christ Jesus. The original is compounded of απο , from, and λυτροω , I redeem, and properly means the price laid down for the redemption of a captive. Comprehendit haec Christi ... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Romans 3:25

Whom God hath set forth - Appointed and published to be a propitiation, ιλαστηριον , the mercy-seat, or place of atonement; because the blood of the sacrifice was sprinkled on and before that, in order to obtain remission of sin, punishment, etc. The mercy-seat was the lid or cover of the ark of the covenant, where God was manifest in the symbol of his presence, between the cherubim; therefore the atonement that was made in this place was properly made to God himself. See the note on Luke... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Romans 3:24

Verse 24 24.Being justified freely, etc. A participle is here put for a verb according to the usage of the Greek language. The meaning is, — that since there remains nothing for men, as to themselves, but to perish, being smitten by the just judgment of God, they are to be justified freely through his mercy; for Christ comes to the aid of this misery, and communicates himself to believers, so that they find in him alone all those things in which they are wanting. There is, perhaps, no passage... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Romans 3:25

Verse 25 25.Whom God hath set forth, etc. The Greek verb, προτίθεναι, means sometimes to determine beforehand, and sometimes to set forth. If the first meaning be taken, Paul refers to the gratuitous mercy of God, in having appointed Christ as our Mediator, that he might appease the Father by the sacrifice of his death: nor is it a small commendation of God’s grace that he, of his own good will, sought out a way by which he might remove our curse. According to this view, the passage fully... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Romans 3:21-26

"No difference." The Bible presents us with three pictures of man's condition and character. They are very different, and yet they are all true pictures. There is the picture of man before the Fall, as he walked with God in primeval innocence of heart and sinless purity of life. There is the picture of man after the Fall, with the Divine image marred and stained by sin. And then there is the picture of man renewed again—man an object of Divine mercy, man a subject of Divine grace, man... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Romans 3:21-26

Redemption working righteousness. A whole system of theology is compacted into these few words. The keystone of the arch. We have here—redemption; righteousness. I. REDEMPTION . The redemption centres in Christ; it touches on either side God and man. Originating in the purposes of God, and actualized in the work of Christ, it is appropriated in the consciousness of man. These verses deal with one aspect of Christ's work and of man's salvation—justification through Christ's atoning... read more

Group of Brands