Read & Study the Bible Online - Bible Portal
Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 110:5-7

Here we have our great Redeemer, I. Conquering his enemies (Ps. 110:5, 6) in order to the making of them his footstool, Ps. 110:1. Our Lord Jesus will certainly bring to nought all the opposition made to his kingdom, and bring to ruin all those who make that opposition and persist in it. He will be too hard for those, whoever they may be, that fight against him, against his subjects and the interest of his kingdom among men, either by persecutions or by perverse disputings. Observe here, 1.... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 110:7

He shall drink of the brook in the way ,.... This some understand of the sufferings of Christ, compared to a brook, a flow of waters, because of the abundance of them, as in Psalm 69:1 , his partaking of which is sometimes expressed by drinking, Matthew 20:22 and this was in the way of working out the salvation of his people, and in his own way to glory, Luke 24:26 . If this is the sense, there may be some allusion to the black brook Kidron; over which David, the type of Christ, passed... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 110:7

He shall drink of the brook in the way - He shall have sore travail, and but little ease and refreshment: but he shall still go on from conquering to conquer. Therefore shall he lift up the head - Or his head. He shall succeed in all his enterprises, and at last be peaceably settled in his ample dominions. But these verses, as well as the former, may be applied to our Lord. The fifth verse may be an address to Jehovah: Adonai at thy right hand, O Jehovah, shall smite kings - bring down... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 110:7

Verse 7 7He shall drink Not a few interpreters, in my opinion, expound this verse in a very harsh manner: that the carnage would be so great, as to cause the blood of the slain to flow in torrents, out of which Christ, the Conqueror, might drink till he was satiated. (332) Akin to this is the exposition of those who would have it to be a figurative representation of misery and grief, and thus descriptive of the many afflictions to which Christ was liable during this transitory life. The... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

There seem to be no sufficient grounds for rejecting the traditional views of the authorship and the interpretation. The psalm belongs to the same class as Psalm it. It is wholly Messianic. David has had revelations made to him concerning the kingdom, the priesthood, and the ultimate victory of the Messiah over the entire power of evil. In a grand burst of song, rough and rugged, no doubt, but full of energy and genius, he addresses Messiah, and sets forth his praise and glory, the mighty... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

The victorious King. New Testament references leave no doubt as to the Messianic character of this psalm. "The image of a warrior destroying his foes may seem a strange representation of the establishment upon earth of Christ's spiritual dominion. But David described Messiah's victory over his enemies by images familiar to him as a warrior; so Ezekiel drew his images out of the forms of the Assyrian world." Here, in prophetic vision, we see Christ our Lord— I. HOLDING THE MOST ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:1-7

Christ the Divine King and Priest. Many difficulties in the interpretation of this psalm. Let us accept it as, in the main, a prophecy of the Jewish Messiah. Then we find the two main features of it fulfilled in the Christ of history. I. HE HAS BEEN RAISED TO THE DIVINE THRONE OF KINGLY POWER . ( Psalms 110:1-3 .) 1. The power by which he subdues the world is spiritual and Divine . His cross "the rod of his strength." 2. His servants are willing... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:7

He shall drink of the brook in the way. Primarily, the action described is that of pausing in the pursuit of enemies to refresh one's self with a draught of water from a brook by the wayside; but, if we interpret the passage of the Messiah, we must understand the refreshing draughts which he ever draws from the well-spring of truth and righteousness as he advances on his career of victory. Therefore ( i . e . because of these draughts) he shall lift up the head . He shall never... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:7

The brook by the way. This psalm tells of the glory of the Lord Jesus Christ, but all that it tells of has not yet been fulfilled. But the Church is still confidently assisting the glory of the Lord. Our text is difficult of completely satisfactory explanation. Three chief interpretations have been given. I. THAT IT TELLS OF OUR LORD 'S BEING MADE A CURSE FOR US . The wrath of God running in the channel of the curse of the Law was "the brook by the way" of which... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 110:7

Spiritual refreshment for spiritual work. "He shall drink of the brook in the way: therefore shall he lift up the head." The literal meaning of the figure is easy to trace. "The victorious leader, who has made so terrible a slaughter that the field of battle is covered with corpses, is now seen pursuing his enemies. Wearied with the battle and the pursuits, he stops for a moment on his way to refresh himself by drinking of the torrent rushing by, and then ' lifts up his head,' derives new... read more

Group of Brands