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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary - Psalms 89:38-52

In these verses we have, I. A very melancholy complaint of the present deplorable state of David's family, which the psalmist thinks hard to be reconciled to the covenant God made with David. ?Thou saidst thou wouldst not take away thy lovingkindness, but thou hast cast off.? Sometimes, it is no easy thing to reconcile God's providences with his promises, and yet we are sure they are reconcilable; for God's works fulfil his word and never contradict it. 1. David's house seemed to have lost its... read more

John Gill

John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary - Psalms 89:51

Wherewith thine enemies have reproached, O Lord ,.... Which carries in it another argument why the Lord should take notice of these reproaches; because they come not only from their enemies, but from his also, and the enemies of his Son, who would not have him, the King Messiah, to reign over them, and are said to reproach him in the next clause: wherewith they have reproached the footsteps of thine Anointed ; or thy Messiah; so Aben Ezra and Kimchi interpret it of the Messiah: Jarchi... read more

Adam Clarke

Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 89:51

They have reproached the footsteps of thine anointed - They search into the whole history of thy people; they trace it up to the earliest times; and they find we have been disobedient and rebellious; and on this account we suffer much, alas, deserved reproach. The Chaldee gives this clause a singular turn: "Thy enemies have reproached the slowness of the footsteps of the feet of thy Messiah, O Lord. We have trusted in him as our great Deliverer, and have been daily in expectation of his... read more

John Calvin

John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible - Psalms 89:51

Verse 51 51.With which thy enemies, O Jehovah! have reproached thee. What the Psalmist now affirms is, not that the wicked torment the saints with their contumelious language, but that they revile even God himself. And he makes this statement, because it is a much more powerful plea for obtaining favor in the sight of God, to beseech him to maintain his own cause, because all the reproaches by which the simplicity of our faith is held up to scorn recoil upon himself, than to beseech him to do... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 89:1-52

Psalms 89:52 is no part of the psalm, but the doxology which concludes the Book. read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 89:1-52

The general subject— God's promise to David and his seed but the present state of things is a bitter contrast to the promise, and a prayer that God would remove the contrast. Suggests— I. THAT GOD HAS ENTERED INTO A GRAND COVENANT WITH MANKIND . Given us the greatest and most precious promises. 1 . Promises that relate to our highest nature. "I will be a Father to them, and ye shall be my sons and daughters." 2 . That relate to our greatest calamity. ... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 89:46-51

The psalm ends with an appeal to God—"How long" is the present state of things to continue? How long is God's wrath to endure? Will he not remember how weak and futile, how short-lived and fleeting, the whole race of man is? Well he not bethink him of his old loving kindnesses to David, and of the promises made to him, and confirmed by oath? Will he not therefore remove their reproach from Israel, and especially from his anointed, on whom the disgrace chiefly falls? To these questions there... read more

Spence, H. D. M., etc.

The Pulpit Commentary - Psalms 89:51

Wherewith thine enemies have reproached, O Lord; wherewith they have reproached the footsteps of thine anointed. The reproach which rests upon the people rests no less upon their king—upon his "footsteps," his movements, all that he does, "every step he takes" (Bishop Perowne). This is an additional affliction to the psalmist, and emphasizes his last cry to God for mercy. read more

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible - Psalms 89:51

Wherewith thine enemies have reproached, O Lord - Have reproached thee and me. Wherewith they reproach thy character and cause, and reproach me for having trusted to promises which seem not to be fulfilled. As the representative of thy cause, I am compelled to bear all this, and it breaks my heart.Wherewith they have reproached the footsteps of thine anointed - Of myself, as the anointed king. They have reproached my footsteps; that is, they have followed me with reproaches - treading along... read more

Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments - Psalms 89:51

Psalms 89:51. Wherewith thine enemies have reproached the footsteps of thine anointed Or, of the Messiah. By whom he seems to understand, either, 1st, The kings of Judah, the singular number being put for the plural; and by their footsteps may be meant either their ways or actions, and the sad consequences thereof, or the memorials of their ancient splendour. Or, 2d, The Messiah himself, whose coming the Jews continually expected, for a long time together before he came, and supported... read more

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