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Adam Clarke
Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Contained in 6 volumes, consisting of nearly 1,000 pages each, it was considered the most comprehensive commentary on the Bible ever prepared by one man. Adam Clarke's monumental commentary on the Bible has been a standard reference work for over a century and has been widely used by men of all evangelical denominations. Its thorough and authoritative scholarship has been recognized by Arminians and Calvinists alike, and has won for the author the accolade, "Prince of Commentators."

Adam Clarke (1760 or 1762 - 1832) was a British Methodist theologian and Biblical scholar. He is chiefly remembered for writing a commentary on the Bible which took him 40 years to complete and which was a primary Methodist theological resource for two centuries.Wikipedia... Show more
John Calvin
John Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

A classic commentary on the Old and New Testaments, complete and unabridged. Written in a clear, lucid style, it combines a profound reverence for the Bible with a rare objectivity in its exegesis. One of the most influential bible scholars of all time, John Calvin, although controversial, is a force to be reckoned with. His commentaries reflect an incredible command of the Scriptures, as he sought to integrate the entirety of its teaching by combining a solid exegetical method with a pastoral insight that is often neglected in commentaries today.

John Calvin was an influential French theologian, pastor and reformer during the Protestant Reformation.Wikipedia... Show more
John Gill
John Gills Exposition of the Bible Commentary

John Gill's Exposition offers a verse-by-verse exposition of the entire Holy Bible with much of the information provided found nowhere else outside of the ancient Jewish writings. This Commentary is a valuable resource for anyone interested in a deeper appreciation of the Biblical text. Gill’s commentaries are still widely used today by laity and pastors, being theologically sound and practical for daily study. Gill makes the Scripture accessible and applicable to the everyday reader, believing that sound doctrine impacts daily life. The Works of John Gill is an essential resource for any student of the Scriptures and of Reformed thinking. Perfect for the general reader, professors, and Bible scholars, these work will enlighten, encourage, and stimulate thinking and application. Gill’s writings include everything from exposition, commentary, essays, and a biography to help aid understanding of this prominent man of faith and his works.

John Gill (23 November 1697 – 14 October 1771) was an English Baptist pastor, biblical scholar, and theologian who held to a firm Calvinistic soteriology. Born in Kettering, Northamptonshire, he attended Kettering Grammar School where he mastered the Latin classics and learned Greek by age 11. He continued self-study in everything from logic to Hebrew, his love for the latter remaining throughout his life.Wikipedia... Show more
Matthew Henry
Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary

Matthew Henry's well-known six-volume Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1708–10) or Complete Commentary, provides an exhaustive verse by verse study of the Bible. covering the whole of the Old Testament, and the Gospels and Acts in the New Testament. After the author's death, the work was finished (Romans through Revelation) by thirteen other nonconformist ministers, partly based upon notes taken by Henry's hearers, and edited by George Burder and John Hughes in 1811. Henry's commentaries are primarily exegetical, dealing with the scripture text as presented, with his prime intention being explanation, for practical and devotional purposes. While not being a work of textual research, for which Henry recommended Matthew Poole's Synopsis Criticorum, Henry's Exposition gives the result of a critical account of the original as of his time, with practical application. It was considered sensible and stylish, a commentary for devotional purposes.

Matthew Henry (18 October 1662 – 22 June 1714) was a Nonconformist minister and author, born in Wales but spending much of his life in England.Wikipedia... Show more
Spence, H. D. M., etc.
The Pulpit Commentary

The Pulpit Commentary is a homiletic commentary on the Bible created during the nineteenth century under the direction of Rev. Joseph S. Exell and Henry Donald Maurice Spence-Jones. It consists of 23 volumes with 22,000 pages and 95,000 entries, and was written over a 30-year period with 100 contributors.

Rev. Joseph S. Exell M.A. served as the editor of Clerical World, The Homiletical Quarterly and the Monthly Interpreter. Exell was also the editor for several other large commentary sets like The Men of the Bible, The Preacher's Homiletic Library and The Biblical Illustrator. Henry Donald Maurice Spence-Jones was the Vicar and Rural Dean of St. Pancras, London and the principal of Gloucester Theological College.Wikipedia... Show more
William Barclay
William Barclay's Daily Study Bible

17 volumes of the William Barclay's Commentary on the Bible New Testament. This NT commentary set is excellent and often recognized for it's devotional value.

William Barclay (5 December 1907, Wick - 24 January 1978, Glasgow) was a Scottish author, radio and television presenter, Church of Scotland minister, and Professor of Divinity and Biblical Criticism at the University of Glasgow.Wikipedia... Show more
Albert Barnes
Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Educated at Princeton seminary, Albert Barnes was a dedicated student of the Bible. Though passed over by the biographical sketches of influential theological writers, his notes on the Whole Bible continue to be quite popular even today.

Albert Barnes (1798-1870) was an American theologian, born at Rome, New York, on December 1, 1798. He graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, in 1820, and from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823. Barnes was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825-1830), and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia (1830-1867).He held a prominent place in the New School branch of the Presbyterians during the Old School-New School Controversy, to which he adhered on the division of the denomination in 1837; he had been tried (but not convicted) for heresy in 1836, the charge being particularly against the views expressed by him in Notes on Romans (1835) of the imputation of the sin of Adam, original sin and the atonement; the bitterness stirred up by this trial contributed towards widening the breach between the conservative and the progressive elements in the church. He was an eloquent preacher, but his reputation rests chiefly on his expository works, which are said to have had a larger circulation both in Europe and America than any others of their class.Of the well-known Notes on the Whole Bible, it is said that more than a million volumes had been issued by 1870. The Notes on Job, the Psalms, Isaiah and Daniel found scarcely less acceptance. Displaying no original critical power, their chief merit lies in the fact that they bring in a popular (but not always accurate) form the results of the criticism of others within the reach of general readers. Barnes was the author of several other works of a practical and devotional kind, including Scriptural Views of Slavery (1846) and The Way of Salvation (1863). A collection of his Theological Works was published in Philadelphia in 1875.In his famous 1852 oratory, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?", Frederick Douglass quoted Barnes as saying: "There is no power out of the church that could sustain slavery an hour, if it were not sustained in it."Barnes died in Philadelphia on December 24, 1870.Wikipedia... Show more
Alexander MacLaren
Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Maclaren was born in Glasgow on February 11, 1826, and died in Manchester on May 5, 1910. He had been for almost sixty-five years a minister, entirely devoted to his calling. He lived more than almost any of the great preachers of his time between his study, his pulpit, his pen.

Maclaren was born in Glasgow on February 11, 1826, and died in Manchester on May 5, 1910. He had been for almost sixty-five years a minister, entirely devoted to his calling. He lived more than almost any of the great preachers of his time between his study, his pulpit, his pen.He subdued action to thought, thought to utterance and utterance to the Gospel. His life was his ministry; his ministry was his life. In 1842 he was enrolled as a candidate for the Baptist ministry at Stepney College, London. He was tall, shy, silent and looked no older than his sixteen years. But his vocation, as he himself (a consistent Calvinist) might have said, was divinely decreed. "I cannot ever recall any hesitation as to being a minister," he said. "It just had to be."In the College he was thoroughly grounded in Greek and Hebrew. He was taught to study the Bible in the original and so the foundation was laid for his distinctive work as an expositor and for the biblical content of his preaching. Before Maclaren had finished his course of study he was invited to Portland Chapel in Southampton for three months; those three months became twelve years. He began his ministry there on June 28, 1846. His name and fame grew.His ministry fell into a quiet routine for which he was always grateful: two sermons on Sunday, a Monday prayer meeting and a Thursday service and lecture. His parishioners thought his sermons to them were the best he ever preached. In April 1858 he was called to be minister at Union Chapel in Manchester. No ministry could have been happier. The church prospered and a new building had to be erected to seat 1,500; every sitting was taken. His renown as preacher spread throughout the English-speaking world. His pulpit became his throne. He was twice elected President of the Baptist Union. He resigned as pastor in 1905 after a ministry of forty-five years.Maclaren's religious life was hid with Christ in God. He walked with God day by day. He loved Jesus Christ with a reverent, holy love and lived to make Him known. In his farewell sermon at Union he said: "To efface oneself is one of a preacher's first duties."Wikipedia... Show more
Arno Clemens Gaebelein
Arno Gaebelein's Annotated Bible

First published in 1922, this nine-volume commentary by Arno C. Gaebelein is praised and respected by legions of devoted students. This commentary on the whole Bible has been a standard reference work for most of a century, and the strident words of A. C. Gaebelein still ring with timeless truth.

For more than half a century evangelist, author, journalist, and Bible expositor Arno C. Gaebelein passionately proclaimed the prophetic truths of the Bible and daily lived with the hope of their fulfillment. With a ministry that bridged two centuries and endured two world wars, Gaebelein never doubted the relevance of the study of prophecy for spiritual growth and for interaction with the chaos of culture. In the midst of the thundering storms of World War I, he encouraged Christians not to despair, for the trials of this world would one day give way to the triumph of Christ. In 1915 he wrote:Wikipedia... Show more
Arthur Peake
Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

First published in 1919, Peake's commentary of the bible was a one-volume commentary that gave special attention to Biblical archaeology and the then-recent discoveries of biblical manuscripts. Biblical quotations in this edition were from the Revised Version of the Bible.

Arthur Samuel Peake (1865-1929) was an English biblical scholar, born at Leek, Staffordshire, and educated at St John's College, Oxford. He was the first holder of the Rylands Chair of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis in the University of Manchester, from its establishment as an independent institution in 1904. He was thus the first non-Anglican to become a professor of divinity in an English university.In 1890-92 he was a lecturer at Mansfield College, Oxford, and from 1890 to 1897 held a fellowship at Merton College.In 1892, however, he was invited to become tutor at the Primitive Methodist Theological Institute in Manchester, which was renamed Hartley College in 1906. He was largely responsible for broadening the curriculum which intending Primitive Methodist ministers were required to follow, and for raising the standards of the training.In 1895-1912 he served as lecturer in the Lancashire Independent College, from 1904 to 1912 also in the United Methodist College at Manchester. In 1904 he was appointed Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis in the (Victoria) University of Manchester. (This chair was in the Faculty of Theology established in that year; it was renamed "Rylands Professor, etc." in 1909.)Peake was also active as a layman in wider Methodist circles, and did a great deal to further the reunion of Methodism which took effect in 1932, three years after his death. In the wider ecumenical sphere Peake worked for the National Council of Evangelical Free Churches, serving as president in 1928, and was a member of the World Conference on Faith and Order held in Lausanne in 1927. He published and lectured extensively, but is best remembered for his one-volume commentary on the Bible (1919), which, in its revised form, is still in use.The University of Aberdeen made him an honorary D. D. in 1907. He was a governor of the John Rylands Library.Wikipedia... Show more
Donald C. Fleming
Bridgeway Bible Commentary

The Bridgeway Bible Commentary deals with each biblical book in such a way that readers readily see the meaning of the Bible in its own context and its relevance in today's world. It is neither a word-by-word technical reference work nor a mere collection of overviews. It provides a free-flowing commentary on the entire text of each biblical book, along with background material, maps, diagrams, drawings, tables and feature articles.

Bridgeway Books, though credible reference works, are non-technical in style. They are based on a firm biblical scholarship and the assured belief that once readers understand the Bible, they will find it has its own way of making itself relevant to them. Preachers, teachers and other Christian workers have found that these books do much of the preparation work for them, by helping them understand the Bible as it might have been understood by its first readers.Bridgeway Books have been written by Don Fleming who has had wide experience in evangelism, church planting and Bible teaching, in his home country of Australia, and in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Pacific. He is well known for his ability to explain the Bible writings concisely and simply, both in his preaching and in his writing.Bridgeway Books have been translated into more than forty five languages.The "bridge" element in the title reflects the aim of all Bridgeway books - to bridge two gaps at once - the gap between the word of the Bible and the world of today; and the gap between technical reference works and the ordinary reader.Bridgeway Books are easy to read and especially suited to those who use English as a second language.In its previous format as a series of eight Bridge Bible Handbooks, this commentary built up an international reputation for its appeal to a wide range of people - ordinary readers, Bible students, pastors, teachers and other Christian workers. It strikes the middle ground between the overly scholastic detailed commentaries and the often light-weight devotional notes.The Bridgeway Bible Commentary deals with each biblical book in such a way that readers readily see the meaning of the Bible in its own context and its relevance in today's world. It is neither a word-by-word technical reference work nor a mere collection of overviews. It provides a free-flowing commentary on the entire text of each biblical book, along with background material, maps, diagrams, drawings, tables and feature articles.Wikipedia... Show more
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

These expository outlines (or "skeletons") are not a verse-by-verse explanation of the English Bible. Rather, they are a chapter-by-chapter study with explanations of the most important and instructive verses in each chapter.

Charles Simeon (September 24, 1759 - November 13, 1836), was an English evangelical clergyman.He was born at Reading, Berkshire and educated at Eton College and King's College, Cambridge. In 1782 he became fellow of King's College, and took orders, receiving the living of Holy Trinity Church, Cambridge, in the following year. He was at first so unpopular that services were frequently interrupted, and he was often insulted in the streets. Having overcome public prejudice, he subsequently gained a remarkable and lasting influence among the undergraduates of the university.He became a leader among evangelical churchmen, was one of the founders of the Church Missionary Society in 1799, the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews (now known as the Church's Ministry Among Jewish People or CMJ) in 1809, and acted as adviser to the British East India Company in the choice of chaplains for India.In 1792 he read An Essay on the Composition of a Sermon by the French Reformed minister Jean Claude. Simeon found that their principles were identical and used the essay as the basis for his lectures on sermon composition. Claude's essay also inspired Simeon to make clear his own theological position, the result being Horae Homileticae, his chief work.He published hundreds of sermons and outlines of sermons (called "sermon skeletons"), still in print, that to some were an invitation to clerical plagiarism. His chief work is a commentary on the whole Bible, entitled Horae homileticae (London). The Simeon Trust was established by him for the purpose of acquiring church patronage to perpetuate evangelical clergy in Church of England parishes. It continues to operate to this day.Charles Simeon is often hailed as something of an ancestor of the evangelical movement in the Church of England.According to the historian Thomas Macaulay, Simeon's "authority and influence...extended from Cambridge to the most remote corners of England, ...his real sway in the Church was far greater than that of any primate." He is remembered in the Episcopal Church of the United States with a Lesser Feast and in the Anglican Church of Canada with a Commemoration on 12 November. In the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on 13 November. His memorial by the monumental mason Hopper in Holy Trinity Church (Cambridge), was described by architectural critic Nikolaus Pevsner as an "epitaph in Gothic forms."Wikipedia... Show more
Chuck Smith
Chuck Smith Bible Commentary

This commentary consists of transcriptions of recordings of Pastor Chuck Smith's "Through the Bible" messages delivered at Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa.

Charles Ward "Chuck" Smith (June 25, 1927 - October 3, 2013) was an American pastor who founded the Calvary Chapel movement. Beginning with the 25-person Costa Mesa congregation in 1965, Smith's influence now extends to thousands of congregations worldwide, some of which are among the largest churches in the United States. He has been called "one of the most influential figures in modern American Christianity."Smith graduated from LIFE Bible College and was ordained as a pastor for the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel. In the late 1950s, Smith was the campaign manager and worship director for healing evangelist Paul Cain. After being a pastor for a different denomination, he left his denomination to pastor a non-denominational church plant in Corona, California, and eventually moved to a small pre-existing church called Calvary Chapel in Costa Mesa, California in December 1965.Chuck Smith is the author and co-author of several books; titles of his books include Answers for Today; Calvary Chapel Distinctives; Calvinism, Arminianism & The Word of God; Charisma vs. Charismania; Comfort for Those Who Mourn; Effective Prayer Life; Harvest; Living Water; The Claims of Christ; The Gospel According to Grace; The Philosophy of Ministry of Calvary Chapel; Why Grace Changes Everything; Love: The More Excellent Way; The Final Act; and others.Wikipedia... Show more
James Burton Coffman
Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

One of the leading authorities in the Church of Christ, Dr. Coffman presents a verse by verse look at God's Word.

James Burton Coffman was a prolific author, preacher, teacher and leader among churches of Christ in the 20th century.He was born May 24, 1905, in Taylor County to pioneer West Texans "so far out in the country it took two days to go to town and back." He became a Christian in 1923. In Texas, Coffman graduated from Abilene High School and enrolled in Abilene Christian College (now University), graduating in 1927 with a B.A. in history and music.After earning his degree, Coffman served as a high school principal for two years in Callahan County, then taught history and English at Abilene High School.In 1930, he was offered a position as associate minister and song leader in Wichita Falls, the beginning of his career as a minister. Then, he married Thelma "Sissy" Bradford in 1931. Coffman preached for congregations in Texas; Oklahoma; Washington, D.C.; and New York City. In his lifetime, Coffman received 3 honorary doctorates.While in Washington, he was offered the opportunity to serve as guest chaplain for the U.S. Armed Forces in Japan and Korea and served 90 days, holding Gospel meetings throughout both countries.Coffman conducted hundreds of gospel meetings throughout the U.S. and, at one count, baptized more than 3,000 souls.Retiring in 1971, he returned to Houston. One of his most notable accomplishments was writing a 37-volume commentary of the entire Bible, verse by verse, which was finished in 1992. This commentary is being sold all over the world. Many people consider the Coffman series to be one of the finest modern, conservative commentary sets written.Coffman's conservative interpretations affirm the inerrancy of the Bible and clearly point readers toward Scripture as the final basis for Christian belief and practice. This series was written with the thorough care of a research scholar, yet it is easy to read. The series includes every book of the Old and New Testaments.After being married to Sissy for 64 years, she passed away. Coffman then married June Bristow Coffman. James Burton Coffman died on Friday, June 30, 2006, at the age of 101.Wikipedia... Show more
Robert Jamieson; A. R. Fausset; David Brown
Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

A one-volume commentary prepared by Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset and David Brown. It was published in 1871.

At a time when the theological winds seem to change direction on a daily basis, the Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible is a welcome breath of fresh air from conservative and orthodox teachers of the Christian faith. This commentary has been a bestseller since its original publication in 1871 due to its scholarly rigor and devotional value. Robert Jamieson (1802-1880), Andrew Robert Fausset, and David Brown(1803-1897) have crafted a detailed, yet not overly technical, commentary of the Bible that holds to the historic teachings of orthodox Christianity. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible is based on a detailed exegesis of the scriptures in the original languages and is a "must have" for those who are interested in a deeper appreciation of the Biblical text.The designation of this electronic edition of the commentary as expanded refers to the editor's preference for complete words rather than abbreviations in the commentary (with the exception of Scripture references); the addition of white space in layout by placing on new lines the portion of the Scripture on which commentary has been provided by the authors; the replacement of the standard abbreviations "ch." and "vs." in citations with a complete reference to the Bible book, chapter, and verse; the rendering of the abbreviation of standard reference works by Greek and Latin Fathers in full English titles. The purpose of these expansions is to make the Commentary more readable and accessible to the modern reader.It is worth noting that in the printed version, errors in spelling, punctuation, numbering, cross references have followed throughout the printing history of this one-volume edition of the Commentary. This electronic edition, then, may represent the first corrected edition.Robert Jamieson D.D. (1802-1880). Jamieson was the son of a baker in Edinburgh, born there on Jan 3, 1802. He was educated at the high school and entered Edinburgh University with the intention of of studying for the medical profession. However, before completing his studies Jamieson decided to devote himself to the ministry, gaining license as a preacher in 1827. In 1848, the University of Glasgow conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity.For many years Jamieson took a prominent part in ecclesiastical business and in 1872 he was unanimously chosen moderator of the General Assembly. He continued to occupy his place as minister of St. Paul's until his death on October 26, 1880. Jamieson specially charged himself with the oversight of young men studying for the ministry, and his students' class exercised an important influence throughout the church.Andrew Fausset, A.M. (1821-1910). Fausset was the son of the Rev. William Fausset by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew Fausset, provost of Sligo; the family was of French origin. Educated first at Dungannon Royal School, he obtained a scholarship at Trinity College, Dublin in 1838. Gaining prizes and awards there, he graduated B.A. in 1843 (senior moderator in classics), and won the vice-chancellor's Latin verse prize both that year and in 1844. He obtained the divinity testimonium (second class) in 1845, and graduated M.A. in 1846, proceeding B.D. and D.D. in 1886.On graduating, Fausset became an academic coach at Trinity. He was ordained deacon in 1847 and priest in 1848 by Edward Maltby, the Bishop of Durham, and served from 1847 to 1859 as curate of Bishop Middleham, a Durham colliery village. From 1859 until his death he was rector of the parish of St Cuthbert's Church, York.David Brown (1803-1897). Brown was born at Aberdeen Aug. 17, 1803 and died there July 3, 1897. He studied at the University of Aberdeen (M.A., 1821); was licensed 1826, and was assistant to Edward Irving in London 1830-32; was ordained minister of a country chapel six miles southwest of Banff 1836; he went with the Free Church 1843, and the same year became minister of St. James, Glasgow; was elected professor of apologetics, church history, and exegesis of the Gospels at the Free Church College, Aberdeen, 1857; elected principal 1876, and resigned his professorship 1887.He was a director of the National Bible Society of Scotland, one of the founders of the Evangelical Alliance, was deeply interested in the Alliance of the Reformed Churches and a member of the third General Council at Belfast, 1888. He was an opponent of Robertson Smith in the controversy which resulted in the dismissal of the latter from Aberdeen, and as a member of the New Testament revision company took a highly conservative position. He was moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church in 1885.Wikipedia... Show more
John Darby
Darby's Synopsis of the New Testament

These synopses, originally written and published in French, have played a central role in the emergence of fundamentalism and the development of American Christianity.

John Nelson Darby was one of the most prominent among the founders of the Plymouth Brethren; born in London on Nov. 18, 1800; died in Bournemouth on Apr. 29, 1882.He graduated Trinity College, Dublin, in 1819 and was called to the Irish bar about 1825; but soon gave up law practice, took orders, and served a curacy in Wicklow until, in 1827, doubts as to the Scriptural authority for church establishments led him to leave the institutional church altogether and meet with a company of like-minded persons in Dublin.In 1830 he visited Paris, Cambridge, and Oxford, and then went to Plymouth, where an assembly of Brethren was shortly formed, and the town soon lent its name to the movement. James L. Harris, perpetual curate of Plymstock, resigned to unite with them and, in 1834, started the Christian Witness, their first periodical. Darby became an assiduous writer, and published his Parochial Arrangement Destructive of Order in the Church in the first volume of the Witness, and his Apostasy of the Successive Dispensations (afterward published in French as Apostasie de l'economie actuelle) in the same paper in 1836. Dissensions among the Brethren had already begun, and Darby was accused of departing from their original principles.Between 1838 and 1840 Darby worked in Switzerland. In the autumn of 1839 an influential member of the congregation at Lausanne invited him there to oppose Methodism. In March, 1840, he came and obtained a hearing by discourses and a tract, De la doctrine des Wesleyens a l'egard de la perfection. His lectures on prophecy made a great impression, and he soon gathered young men round him at Lausanne, with whom he studied the Scriptures. The fruit of these conferences was his etudes sur la Parole, a work which appeared in English as Synopsis of the Books of the Bible (5 vols., London, 1857-67). Many congregations were formed in Cantons Vaud, Geneva, and Bern. Certain of his followers started a periodical, Le Temoignage des disciples de la Parole.When, by Jesuit intrigues, a revolution broke out in Canton Vaud (Feb., 1845), the Brethren in some parts of Switzerland suffered persecution, and Darby's own life was in jeopardy. He returned to England the same year, but his heart seems ever to have turned toward Switzerland and France. From that time he took a more active lead among the English Brethren, with the result that they became split into two parties, the Darbyites, or exclusives, and the Bethesda, or open, Brethren. In 1853 he visited Elberfeld and again in 1854, when he translated the New Testament into German. He was also in Germany in 1869, when he took part in a translation of the Old Testament into German. He visited Canada and the United States in 1859, 1864-65, 1866-68, 1870, 1872-73, and 1874. About 1871 he went to Italy, and in 1875 to New Zealand. He visited also the West Indies. Between 1878 and 1880 he was much occupied with a translation of the Old Testament into French, in connection with which he sojourned long at Pau. He had already made a French translation of the New Testament in 1859.Darby was a most voluminous writer on a wide range of subjects-doctrinal and controversial, devotional and practical, apologetic, metaphysical, on points of scholarship, etc. His Collected Writings have been published by W. Kelly in thirty-two volumes (London, 1867-83). They include Irrationalism of Infidelity (1853); Remarks on Puseyism (1854); The Sufferings of Christ (1858) and The Righteousness of God (1859), two works which produced much controversy; Analysis of Newman's Apologia (1866); Familiar Conversations on Romanism, written between 1870 and 1880; Meditations on the Acts of the Apostles, composed in Italian; Letters on the Revised New Testament (1881), in which he criticized the revisers principally in respect to the aorist tense, a subject he had previously discussed in the preface to an English translation of the New Testament (2d ed., 1872). He was a hymn-writer and edited the hymnal in general use among the Brethren. A volume of his Spiritual Songs was published in London in 1883, and three volumes of his letters in 1886-89.Wikipedia... Show more
E.W. Bullinger
E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The Companion Bible is popular among Christians who want to understand God's Word in the trusted and familiar language of the King James Text. The Companion Bible is sometimes touted by proponents of the KJV as a free and compelling Study Bible that remains immune to the trends of modern Study Bibles and translations.

Ethelbert William Bullinger AKC (December 15, 1837 - June 6, 1913) was an Anglican clergyman, Biblical scholar, and ultradispensationalist theologian.He was born in Canterbury, Kent, England, the youngest of five children of William and Mary (Bent) Bullinger. His family traced their ancestry back to Heinrich Bullinger, the Swiss Reformer.His formal theological training was at King's College London from 1860-1861, earning an Associate's degree. After graduation, on October 15, 1861, he married Emma Dobson, thirteen years his senior. He later received a Doctor of Divinity degree in 1881 from Archibald Campbell Tait, Archbishop of Canterbury who cited Bullinger's "eminent service in the Church in the department of Biblical criticism."Bullinger's career in the Church of England spanned 1861 until 1888. He began as associate curate in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey in 1861, and was ordained as a priest in the Church of England in 1862. He served as parish curate in Tittleshall from 1863-1866; Notting Hill from 1866-1869; Leytonstone, 1869-1870; then Walthamstow until he became vicar of the newly established parish of St. Stephen's in 1874. He resigned his vicarage in 1888.In the spring of 1867, Bullinger became clerical secretary of the Trinitarian Bible Society, a position he would hold till his death in 1913. Bullinger was editor of a monthly journal Things to Come subtitled A Journal of Biblical Literature, with Special Reference to Prophetic Truth. The Official Organ of Prophetic Conferences for over 20 years (1894-1915) and contributed many articles.Wikipedia... Show more
Charles John Ellicott
Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

This unique Bible Commentary is to be highly recommended for its worth to Pastors and Students. Its expositions are simple and satisfying, as well as scholarly. Among its most commendable features, mention should be made of the following: It contains profitable suggestions concerning the significance of names used in Scripture.

Charles John Ellicott, compiler of and contributor to this renowned Bible Commentary, was one of the most outstanding conservative scholars of the 18th century. He was born at Whitwell near Stamford, England, on April 25, 1819. He graduated from St. John's College, Cambridge, where other famous expositors like Charles Simeon and Handley Moule studied. As a Fellow of St. John's, he constantly lectured there. In 1847, Charles Ellicott was ordained a Priest in the Church of England. From 1841 to 1848, he served as Rector of Pilton, Rutlandshire. He became Hulsean Professor of Divinity, Cambridge, in 1860. The next three years, 1861 to 1863, he ministered as Dean of Exeter, and later in 1863 became the Lord Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol.Conspicuous as a Bible Expositor, he is still well known for his Critical and Grammatical Commentaries on Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Thessalonians and Philemon. Other printed works include Modern Unbelief, The Being of God, The History and Obligation of the Sabbath.This unique Bible Commentary is to be highly recommended for its worth to Pastors and Students. Its expositions are simple and satisfying, as well as scholarly. Among its most commendable features, mention should be made of the following: It contains profitable suggestions concerning the significance of names used in Scripture.Wikipedia... Show more
William Nicoll
Expositor's Bible Commentary

The Expositor's Bible is one of the most-recognized standards of expository commentaries. It was written by twenty-nine eminent scholars of the day who were also full-time preachers. These writers also represent every important branch of Protestantism.

Sir William Robertson Nicoll CH (October 10, 1851 - May 4, 1923) was a Scottish Free Church minister, journalist, editor, and man of letters.Nicoll was born in Lumsden, Aberdeenshire, the son of a Free Church minister. He was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School and graduated MA at the University of Aberdeen in 1870, and studied for the ministry at the Free Church Divinity Hall there until 1874, when he was ordained minister of the Free Church at Dufftown, Banffshire. Three years later he moved to Kelso, and in 1884 became editor of The Expositor for Hodder & Stoughton, a position he held until his death.In 1885 Nicoll was forced to retire from pastoral ministry after an attack of typhoid had badly damaged his lung. In 1886 he moved south to London, which became the base for the rest of his life. With the support of Hodder and Stoughton he founded the British Weekly, a Nonconformist newspaper, which also gained great influence over opinion in the churches in Scotland.Nicoll secured many writers of exceptional talent for his paper (including Marcus Dods, J. M. Barrie, Ian Maclaren, Alexander Whyte, Alexander Maclaren, and James Denney), to which he added his own considerable talents as a contributor. He began a highly popular feature, "Correspondence of Claudius Clear", which enabled him to share his interests and his reading with his readers. He was also the founding editor of The Bookman from 1891, and acted as chief literary adviser to the publishing firm of Hodder & Stoughton.Among his other enterprises were The Expositor's Bible and The Theological Educator. He edited The Expositor's Greek Testament (from 1897), and a series of Contemporary Writers (from 1894), and of Literary Lives (from 1904).He projected but never wrote a history of The Victorian Era in English Literature, and edited, with T. J. Wise, two volumes of Literary Anecdotes of the Nineteenth Century. He was knighted in 1909, ostensibly for his literrary work, but in reality probably more for his long-term support for the Liberal Party. He was appointed to the Order of the Companions of Honour (CH) in the 1921 Birthday Honours.Wikipedia... Show more
William Nicoll
Expositor's Dictionary of Texts

This large commentary "contains outlines, expositions, and illustrations of Bible texts, with full references to the best homiletic literature" and is suitable for "Bible Expositors" - those who teach and preach and study.

Sir William Robertson Nicoll CH (October 10, 1851 - May 4, 1923) was a Scottish Free Church minister, journalist, editor, and man of letters.Nicoll was born in Lumsden, Aberdeenshire, the son of a Free Church minister. He was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School and graduated MA at the University of Aberdeen in 1870, and studied for the ministry at the Free Church Divinity Hall there until 1874, when he was ordained minister of the Free Church at Dufftown, Banffshire. Three years later he moved to Kelso, and in 1884 became editor of The Expositor for Hodder & Stoughton, a position he held until his death.In 1885 Nicoll was forced to retire from pastoral ministry after an attack of typhoid had badly damaged his lung. In 1886 he moved south to London, which became the base for the rest of his life. With the support of Hodder and Stoughton he founded the British Weekly, a Nonconformist newspaper, which also gained great influence over opinion in the churches in Scotland.Nicoll secured many writers of exceptional talent for his paper (including Marcus Dods, J. M. Barrie, Ian Maclaren, Alexander Whyte, Alexander Maclaren, and James Denney), to which he added his own considerable talents as a contributor. He began a highly popular feature, "Correspondence of Claudius Clear", which enabled him to share his interests and his reading with his readers. He was also the founding editor of The Bookman from 1891, and acted as chief literary adviser to the publishing firm of Hodder & Stoughton.Among his other enterprises were The Expositor's Bible and The Theological Educator. He edited The Expositor's Greek Testament (from 1897), and a series of Contemporary Writers (from 1894), and of Literary Lives (from 1904).He projected but never wrote a history of The Victorian Era in English Literature, and edited, with T. J. Wise, two volumes of Literary Anecdotes of the Nineteenth Century. He was knighted in 1909, ostensibly for his literrary work, but in reality probably more for his long-term support for the Liberal Party. He was appointed to the Order of the Companions of Honour (CH) in the 1921 Birthday Honours.Wikipedia... Show more
Thomas Constable
Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Written by Dr. Thomas L. Constable over a 25-year period, these notes provide commentary on all 66 books of the Bible, and contain more than 7,000 pages of material. Dr. Constable's Notes, also known as expository notes to Dr. Constable's seminary students, are intended to help you to better understand the Bible.

Dr. Thomas Constable graduated from Moody Bible Institute in 1960 and later graduated from Dallas Theological Seminary.Dr. Constable is the founder of Dallas Seminary's Field Education department (1970) and the Center for Biblical Studies (1973), both of which he directed for many years before assuming other responsibilities.Today Dr. Constable maintains an active academic, pulpit supply, and conference-speaking ministry around the world. He has ministered in nearly three dozen countries and written commentaries on every book of the Bible.Dr. Constable also founded Plano Bible Chapel, pastored it for twelve years, and has served as one of its elders for over thirty years.Wikipedia... Show more
Frank Binford Hole
F. B. Hole's Old and New Testament Commentary

With an easy to read style, this commentary on the New Testament will be invaluable to Christians old and young who seek to understand the word of God, the salvation He offers in His Son and His plans for our lives.

Frank Binford Hole (1874-1964), evangelist, teacher, author, editor and publisher, played a significant role, during the first half of the twentieth century, in the dissemination of dispensational Bible teaching popularised by such as John Nelson Darby and William Kelly in the late nineteenth century. Whether speaking or writing, he was noted for his clarity of expression and apt illustrations. For many years he edited and contributed to two periodicals: "Edification" and later "Scripture Truth".Hole was educated at King's School in The Strand, London. He worked in the family business, then in banking before becoming a full time evangelist, teacher, writer and publisher. His writings have been valued by Christians all over the world. Billy Graham, on one of his early visits to London sent Mr. Hole his personal greetings and expressed his gratitude for his writing ministry.With an easy to read style, Hole's commentary on the New Testament is invaluable to Christians both old and young who seek to understand the word of God, the salvation He offers in His Son and His plans for our lives.Between 1928 and 1947 F B Hole wrote a series of articles in each of which he worked systematically, chapter by chapter, through a book in the New Testament. These have been collected into four volumes: The Gospels and Acts, Romans and Corinthians, Galatians to Philemon and Hebrews to Revelation, to create a substantial commentary covering the whole of the New Testament. Today, in the twenty-first century, they provide as valuable an aid to interpreting and applying New Testament principles as when they were first written. In his clear pithy style, the writer lays bare the heart of the teaching of the New Testament. Difficulties in interpretation are not avoided, nor the need to examine the practical response which understanding truth requires.Wikipedia... Show more
Frederick Brotherton Meyer
F.B. Meyer's 'Through the Bible' Commentary

Frederick Brotherton Meyer, a contemporary and friend of D. L. Moody and A. C. Dixon, was a Baptist pastor and evangelist in England involved in ministry and inner city mission work on both sides of the Atlantic.

Frederick Brotherton Meyer was born in London. He attended Brighton College and graduated from the University of London in 1869. He studied theology at Regent's Park College, Oxford and began pastoring churches in 1870. His first pastorate was at Pembroke Baptist Chapel in Liverpool. In 1872 he pastored Priory Street Baptist Church in York. While he was there he met the American evangelist Dwight L. Moody, whom he introduced to other churches in England. The two preachers became lifelong friends.Other churches he pastored were Victoria Road Church in Leicester (1874-1878), Melbourne Hall in Leicester (1878- 1888) and Regent's Park Chapel in London (1888-1892). In 1895 Meyer went to Christ Church in Lambeth. At the time only 100 people attended the church, but within two years over 2,000 were regularly attending. He stayed there for fifteen years, and then began traveling to preach at conferences and evangelistic services. His evangelistic tours included South Africa and Asia. He also visited the United States and Canada several times.He spent the last few years of his life working as a pastor in England's churches, but still made trips to North America, including one he made at age 80.Meyer was part of the Higher Life Movement and was known as a crusader against immorality. He preached against drunkenness and prostitution. He is said to have brought about the closing of hundreds of saloons and brothels.Meyer wrote over 40 books, including Christian biographies and devotional commentaries on the Bible. He, along with seven other clergymen, was also a signatory to the London Manifesto asserting that the Second Coming was imminent in 1918. His works include The Way Into the Holiest:, Expositions on the Epistle to the Hebrews (1893) ,The Secret of Guidance, Our Daily Homily and Christian Living.This commentary is a devotional and/or "how to apply the Bible to your life" in nature. The comments are concise but nearly every verse in the Bible is covered, with the exception of 1 Chronicles and parts of Numbers.Wikipedia... Show more
G. Campbell Morgan
G. Campbell Morgan's Exposition on the Whole Bible

Through he had no formal training for the ministry, G. Campbell's devotion to studying of the Bible made him one of the leading Bible teachers in his day. His reputation as preacher and Bible expositor grew throughout England and spread to the United States. This commentary is the culmination of his study of God's Word.

Reverend Doctor George Campbell Morgan D.D. (9 December 1863 - 16 May 1945) was a British evangelist, preacher and a leading Bible scholar. A contemporary of Rodney "Gipsy" Smith, Morgan was the pastor of Westminster Chapel in London from 1904 to 1919, and from 1933 to 1943.In 1883 he was teaching in Birmingham, but in 1886, at the age of 23, he left the teaching profession and devoted himself to preaching and Bible exposition. He was ordained to the Congregational ministry in 1890. He had no formal training for the ministry, but his devotion to studying of the Bible made him one of the leading Bible teachers in his day. His reputation as preacher and Bible expositor grew throughout Britain and spread to the United States.In 1896 D. L. Moody invited him to lecture to the students at the Moody Bible Institute. This was the first of his 54 crossings of the Atlantic to preach and teach. After the death of Moody in 1899 Morgan assumed the position of director of the Northfield Bible Conference. He was ordained by the Congregationalists in London, and given a Doctor of Divinity degree by the Chicago Theological Seminary in 1902. After five successful years in this capacity, he returned to England in 1904 and became pastor of Westminster Chapel in London. During two years of this ministry he was President of Cheshunt College in Cambridge. His preaching and weekly Friday night Bible classes were attended by thousands. In 1910 Morgan contributed an essay entitled The Purposes of the Incarnation to the first volume of The Fundamentals, 90 essays which are widely considered to be the foundation of the modern Fundamentalist movement. Leaving Westminster Chapel in 1919, he once again returned to the United States, where he conducted an itinerant preaching/teaching ministry for 14 years. Finally, in 1933, he returned to England, where he again became pastor of Westminster Chapel and remained there until his retirement in 1943. He was instrumental in bringing Martyn Lloyd-Jones to Westminster in 1939 to share the pulpit and become his successor. Morgan was a friend of F. B. Meyer, Charles Spurgeon, and many other great preachers of his day.Morgan died on 16 May 1945, at the age of 81.Wikipedia... Show more
John Calvin
Geneva Study Bible

Modern believers can read the Scriptures with help from the theology of Calvin, Luther, Zwingli, and other Reformation leaders. It was first printed in 1560.

The Geneva Bible is the Bible with marginal notes authored by John Calvin, John Knox, Miles Coverdale, and many other leaders of the Reformation. The Geneva Bible was the predominant English translation during the period in which the English and Scottish Reformations gained great impetus. Iain Murray, in his classic work on revival and the interpretation of prophecy, The Puritan Hope, notes, "... the two groups in England and Scotland developed along parallel lines, like two streams originating at one fountain. The fountain was not so much Geneva, as the Bible which the exiles newly translated and issued with many marginal notes... it was read in every Presbyterian and Puritan home in both realms".The Cambridge Geneva Bible of 1591 was the edition carried by the Pilgrims when they fled to America. As such, it directly provided much of the genius and inspiration which carried those courageous and faithful souls through their trials, and provided the spiritual, intellectual and legal basis for establishment and flourishing of the colonies. Thus, it became the foundation for establishment of the American Nation. This heritage makes it a Celestial Article indeed! And a treasured possession for any free man!The 1560 Geneva Bible was the first to have Bible chapters divided into numbered verses. The translation is the work of religious leaders exiled from England after the death of King Edward VI in 1553. Almost every chapter has marginal notes to create greater understanding of scripture. The marginal notes often reflected Calvinistic and Protestant reformation influences, not yet accepted by the Church of England. King James I in the late 16th century pronounced the Geneva Bible marginal notes as being: "partial, untrue, seditious, and savouring of dangerous and traitorous conceits." In every copy of each edition the word "breeches" rather than "aprons" was used in Genesis 3:7, which accounts for why the Geneva Bible is sometime called the "Breeches" Bible. The Church of England never authorized or sanctioned the Geneva Bible. However, it was frequently used, without authority, both to read the scripture lessons, and to preach from. It was pre-eminent as a household Bible, and continued so until the middle of the 17th century. The convenient size, cheap price, chapters divided into numbered verses and extensive marginal notes were the cause of it's popularityThe Geneva Bible is a critical, yet almost completely forgotten part of the Protestant Reformation. Driven out of England by the persecutions of Bloody Mary, several future leaders of the Reformation came to Geneva to create a pure and accurate translation of the Holy Writ. Concerned about the influence that the Catholic Church had on the existing translations of the Bible from the Latin, these men turned to the original Hebrew and Greek texts to produce the Geneva Bible. This made the Geneva Bible the first complete Bible to be translated into English from the original Hebrew and Greek texts.The creation of the Geneva Bible was a substantial undertaking. Its authors spent over two years, working diligently day and night by candlelight, to finish the translation and the commentaries. The entire project was funded by the exiled English congregation in Geneva, making the translation a work supported by the people and not by an authoritarian church or monarch.All the marginal commentaries were finished by 1599, making the 1599 edition of the Geneva Bible the most complete study aide for Biblical scholars and students. This edition does not contain the Apocrypha. The Apocrypha's notes are minimal or absent in other editions. Additional highlights of this edition include maps of the Exodus route and Joshua's distribution of land, a name and subject index, and Psalms sung by the English congregation in Geneva.The greatest distinction of the Geneva Bible, however, is the extensive collection of marginal notes that it contains. Prominent Reformation leaders such as John Calvin, John Knox, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Theodore Beza, and Anthony Gilby wrote the majority of these notes in order to explain and interpret the scriptures. The notes comprise nearly 300,000 words, or nearly one-third the length of the Bible itself, and they are justifiably considered the most complete source of Protestant religious thought available.Owing to the marginal notes and the superior quality of the translation, the Geneva Bible became the most widely read and influential English Bible of the 16th and 17th centuries. It was continually printed from 1560 to 1644 in over 200 different editions. It was the Bible of choice for many of the greatest writers, thinkers, and historical figures of the Reformation era. William Shakespeare's plays and the writings of John Milton and John Bunyan were clearly influenced by the Geneva Bible. Oliver Cromwell issued a pamphlet containing excerpts from the Geneva Bible to his troops during the English Civil War. When the Pilgrims set sail on the Mayflower they took with them exclusively the Geneva Bible.The marginal notes of the Geneva Bible enraged the Catholic Church, since the notes deemed the act of confession to men 'the Catholic Bishops' as unjustified by Holy Script. Man should confess to God only; man's private life was man's private life. The notes also infuriated King James, since they allowed disobedience to tyrannical kings. King James went so far as to make ownership of the Geneva Bible a felony. He then proceeded to make his own version of the Bible, but without the marginal notes that had so disturbed him. Consequently, during King James's reign, and into the reign of Charles I, the Geneva Bible was gradually replaced by the King James Bible.Wikipedia... Show more
George Haydock
George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary, following the Douay-Rheims Bible text, was originally compiled by Catholic priest and biblical scholar Reverend George Leo Haydock.

George Leo Haydock (1774-1849), scion of an ancient English Catholic Recusant family, was a priest, pastor and Bible scholar. His edition of the Douay Bible with extended commentary, originally published in 1811, became the most popular English Catholic Bible of the 19th century on both sides of the Atlantic. It remains in print and is still regarded for its apologetic value.His eventful early years included a narrow scrape with the French Revolution and a struggle to complete his priestly studies in the years before Catholic Emancipation. He would go on to serve poor Catholic missions in rural England.Haydock's first assignment was at Ugthorpe, Yorkshire, a poor rural mission. While there, Father Haydock completed the work for which he would be best remembered: commentary for a new edition of the English Catholic Bible. That Bible was called the Douay Version (Douay-Rheims Bible), originally translated from the Latin Vulgate in the 16th century chiefly by Gregory Martin, one of the first professors at the English College, Douai (University of Douai). It was revised and newly annotated in the 18th century by Richard Challoner (1691-1781), a scholar at University of Douai and then Vicar Apostolic of the London District, and later by Father Bernard MacMahon (1736?-1816). Haydock took his text from the Challoner-MacMahon revision, but added a substantially extended commentary. This commentary was partly original and partly compiled from Patristic writings and the writings of later Bible scholars. The Bible had long been used to advance the Protestant cause. However, Catholics used it effectively in their counteroffensive. As Haydock states in his Preface, "To obviate the misinterpretations of the many heretical works which disgrace the Scripture, and deluge this unhappy country, has been one main design of the present undertaking."2011 is the bicentennial anniversary of the Haydock Bible. Its substantial and continuing popularity is reflected in its long history of varied editions. It would remain continuously in print until at least 1910 with a long series of publishers in England and America, and would enjoy a renewal of interest at the end of the 20th century, spurring a new series of reprints and modern digital reproductions. Present day Traditional Roman Catholics who see uncertainty of purpose in the post-Conciliar Church have found inspiration in the English Catholic Recusant movement and in Father Haydock's confident expression of Faith.Wikipedia... Show more
Robert Hawker
Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

The Poor Man's Commentary by Robert Hawker, contains 9,600 comments on the Old and New Testaments. Hawker's writing frequently contains rich, devotional overtones and Hawker often relates passages to Christ.

Robert Hawker (1753-1827) was a Devonian vicar of the Anglican Church and the most prominent of the vicars of Charles Church, Plymouth, Devon. His grandson was Cornish poet Robert Stephen Hawker.Hawker, deemed "Star of the West" for his superlative preaching that drew thousands to Charles to hear him speak for over an hour at a time, was known as a bold evangelical, caring father, active in education and compassionate for the poor and needy of the parish, a scholar and author of many books and deeply beloved of his parishioners.He was a man of great frame, burly, strong and with blue eyes that sparkled and a fresh complexion. His humour was deep and razor sharp and his wit popular although he had a solemn exterior and in conversation would resort to silence while contemplating a difficult retort. He played the violin well and was an excellent scholar. Almost as soon as he arrived as curate he started writing and poured out over the year a long list of books, volumes of sermons, a theological treatise, a popular commentary, a guide to communion and also books of lessons in reading and writing for the schools. For a work of his on the divinity of Christ (combating the rise of Unitarianism) the University of Edinburgh conferred upon him a degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1792. He also produced the "Poor Man's Morning and Evening Portions" that were used long after his death.Wikipedia... Show more
James Gray
James Gray's Concise Bible Commentary

While many Bible commentaries strive for exhaustive treatments of Scripture, Dr. James M. Gray's Concise Bible Commentary instead endeavors to be succinct. According to Gray's own explanation of this work, it "represents the labor of eight years in the use of such spare hours as could be found in an otherwise well-filled life, but had the plan permitted its expansion into a series of volumes instead of one, it might have been completed earlier."

James Martin Gray (May 11, 1851 - September 21, 1935) was a pastor in the Reformed Episcopal Church, a Bible scholar, editor, and hymn writer, and the president of Moody Bible Institute, 1904-34.Gray was born in New York City as one of the younger of eight children. His father, Hugh Gray, died shortly after his birth. James Gray was raised in the Episcopal church, and probably after attending college in New York, he began training for a career as a priest. While preparing himself for the ministry, Gray experienced an evangelical conversion (mostly likely in 1873) after reading homilies on the book of Proverbs by William Arnot. In 1870, Gray married Amanda Thorne, who died in 1875 while giving birth to their fifth child, who also died.As Gray continued to prepare himself for the ministry in New York, the Episcopal Church was troubled by a conflict between evangelicals and Tractarians, who wished to emphasize ritualism. In 1873, Bishop George D. Cummins resigned from the Episcopal Church and helped found the Reformed Episcopal denomination. Gray sided with the seceders.Gray was ordained in 1877, and assumed the pastorate of the Church of the Redemption in Brooklyn, New York for one year. He spent another year at the Church of the Cornerstone in Newburgh. In 1879, Gray was called to assist an elderly pastor at the small Reformed Episcopal Church in Boston, which prospered after his arrival and grew from a handful of worshipers to a congregation of more than 230. The Boston church also managed to establish three additional churches during Gray's pastorate, all of which failed shortly after his departure.While in Boston, he also became involved with Adoniram Judson Gordon in the founding of the Boston Bible and Missionary Training School, later Gordon Divinity School, where he was a professor from 1889 to 1904. In Boston he married Susan G. Gray, who also served on the faculty. During this period, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine, conferred on Gray an honorary doctor of divinity degree.Throughout the 1890s, Gray worked alongside D. L. Moody in the latter's evangelistic campaigns in New York, Boston, and Chicago; and Gray became connected Moody Bible Institute serving in a variety of positions from summer guest lecturer (beginning in 1892) to dean, executive secretary, and finally, president (the third, after D. L. Moody and R. A. Torrey) from 1904 to 1934. Gray also edited Moody Monthly and preached at Moody's Chicago Avenue Church (later known as the Moody Church).On November 1, 1934, he resigned as President of MBI at the age of 83, but continued to serve as President-Emeritus. He died of a heart attack on September 21, 1935. The Torrey-Gray Auditorium at the Moody Bible Institute is named in honor of Gray and his predecessor, R. A. Torrey.Theologically, Gray was an early fundamentalist who upheld the inspiration of the Bible and opposed the contemporary trend toward a social gospel. Gray was also a dispensationalist who believed in the premillennial, pre-tribulational return of Jesus Christ at the Rapture. Personally, Gray was conservative in dress and personal habit. A reporter remarked that he "cultivated gentlemanliness as a fine art." Male students at Moody were required to wear coats and ties in the dining room, and during a hot spell in July 1908, Gray admonished faculty members for taking off their coats and vests in their offices.Gray was one of the seven editors of the first Scofield Reference Bible in 1909. Gray wrote 25 books and pamphlets, some of which remain in print. He also wrote a number of hymns, perhaps the best known of which is Only a Sinner, Saved by Grace.Wikipedia... Show more
James Nisbet
James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

The Church Pulpit Commentary includes work by various important members of the Anglican Church such as Thomas Arnold, Rev. F.D. Maurice and John William Burgon. It includes short essays which cover one verse, sometimes two, at a time that the authors view as important and relevant.

With nearly 5,000 pages and 20 megabytes of text, this 12 volume set contains concise comments and sermon outlines, perfect for preaching, teaching, or just another perspective on a passage for any lay person.James Nisbet compiled and edited the Church Pulpit Commentary. Over 100 authors wrote short essays, sermon outlines, and sermon illustrations for selected verses of the Bible. The authors include Handley Carr Glyn (H.C.G) Moule, F.D. Maurice, and many other bishops and pastors.As with many commentaries of this nature, the New Testament contains substantially more comments than the Old Testament. This is not the famouse Pulpit Commentary. This is a different commentary. Not every verse includes a comment.Wikipedia... Show more
John Dummelow
John Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible

Compiled by 40 Bible Scholars and edited by Dummelow, this commentary has received favorable reviews from Christians of many denominations. At one time, this was one of the most popular commentaries of the 20th century.

Compiled by 40 Bible Scholars and edited by Dummelow, this commentary has received favorable reviews from Christians of many denominations. At one time, this was one of the most popular commentaries of the 20th century. Although not as conservative as the others, it is still quite helpful with detailed introductions and concise comments. All maps and images from the printed edition are included.This commentary provides in a single large but convenient book the essential scholarly information on the Bible necessary to every minister and Bible student.Dummelow's Commentary is distinguished by two remarkable combinations of merits. First, it combines to an extraordinary degree completeness and conciseness. As Bishop Anderson of the Diocese of Chicago has said, it contains "more information attractively presented than can be found in the same amount of space in the whole realm of Bible Literature." Yet it is not too diffuse, nor is the essential information obscured by unnecessary or rambling discourse.Second, it combines in a remarkable way the highest religious reverence with exact scientific rigor. Preachers and theologians of many denominations and various shades of faith have paid tribute to its "conservative liberalism".Wikipedia... Show more
John Trapp
John Trapp Complete Commentary

John Trapp was an English Puritan. His large five-volume commentary is still read today and is known for its pithy statements and quotable prose. His volumes are quoted frequently by other religious writers, including Charles Spurgeon.

John Trapp, (5 June 1601, Croome D'Abitot - 16 October 1669, Weston-on-Avon), was an English Anglican Bible commentator. His large five-volume commentary is still read today and is known for its pithy statements and quotable prose. His volumes are quoted frequently by other religious writers, including Charles Spurgeon (1834 -1892), Ruth Graham, the daughter of Ruth Bell Graham, said that John Trapp, along with C.S. Lewis and George MacDonald, was one of her mother's three favorite sources for quotations.Trapp studied at the Free School in Worcester and then at Christ Church, Oxford (B.A., 1622; M.A., 1624). He became usher of the free school of Stratford-upon-Avon in 1622 and its headmaster in 1624, and was made preacher at Luddington, near Stratford, before becoming vicar of Weston-on-Avon in Gloucestershire. He sided with parliament in the English Civil War and was arrested for a short time. He took the covenant of 1643 and acted as chaplain to the parliamentary soldiers in Stratford for two years. He served as rector of Welford-on-Avon in Gloucestershire between 1646 and 1660 and again as vicar of Weston from 1660 until his death in 1669.Quotes from John Trapp:Wikipedia... Show more
Joseph Benson
Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

One of the most eminent of the early Methodist ministers in England, Joseph Benson was born at Melmerby, in Cumberland, Jan. 25, 1748. At sixteen he became a Methodist and was converted. In 1766 Mr. Wesley appointed him classical master at Kingswood School. He devoted himself closely to philosophy and theology, studying constantly and zealously.

One of the most eminent of the early Methodist ministers in England, Joseph Benson was born at Melmerby, in Cumberland, Jan. 25, 1748. At sixteen he became a Methodist and was converted. In 1766 Mr. Wesley appointed him classical master at Kingswood School. He devoted himself closely to philosophy and theology, studying constantly and zealously.Joseph Benson became a Methodist circuit rider in 1771. A close associate of Wesley, he was chosen to be a member of the Legal One Hundred who governed the Conference at Wesley's death and he was president of the Conference two times. As one of post-Wesley Methodism's most popular preachers, he sometimes addressed crowds of over twenty thousand. Wesley established an extensive organization, including the circuit riding system and a media or press to showcase books, pamphlets, and a monthly magazine. After the death of John Wesley, Joseph Benson took over the Methodist/Wesleyan movement and the organization that Wesley created.During the Bristol dispute of 1794 he led the conservative Church Methodists and was against moves which suggested that the Methodists were breaking ties with the Church of England; he was one of the last leaders to contend for the methods and philosophy of eighteenth-century Wesleyan Methodism. The circulation of The Methodist Magazine rose from ten thousand to twenty-four thousand per issue on his watch, and it was one of the most widely read periodicals in pre-Victorian England. He was an able writer, serving as apologist against Joseph Priestley, as biographer of John Fletcher, and as author of a multi-volume commentary on the Bible.Benson was influential in Methodism, and through the press, especially the magazine, he was able to extend his influence to non-Methodists as well. He and other Methodist leaders, through preaching and publication, disseminated their conservative social and political credo and may be credited in part with creating a climate in which the seeds of Victorianism could thrive.Wikipedia... Show more
Ger de Koning
Kingcomments on the Whole Bible

The purpose of this commentary, available for every book in the Bible, is to encourage people to read the Bible and to aid in their personal study of God's Word.

Born in the Netherlands in 1948, born again in 1966. Sport was my passion. That it was also for some time after my conversion, until, about 1970, I saw the Lord Jesus had a right on my whole life. Since that full surrender the Lord Jesus Christ and the Word of God are my passion. Reading and studying God's Word gave me a deep desire to preach and share God's Word both in teaching the believers to the edification of the church of God, with an especial care for young believers and in the preaching of the gospel to unbelievers.This resulted in the writing of simple but not superficial exegesis of all the books of the Bible as well as on different Biblical topics. Of them a lot are translated in other languages. Further, there are a lot of opportunities to teach the Word of God in addresses, Bible readings and on conferences in the Netherlands and abroad.The Lord has given me a wife, Willy, who is a great help to me. Without her I wouldn't be able to do this work. We married in 1975. The Lord gave us six children. By the grace of God, they all accepted Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. They are all married, with believers who also want to serve Him. We now (2021) have nineteen grandchildren.The whole Bible is a splendid book and it's my prayer that you'll get this impression in an increasing way.I wish you God's blessing!Ger de KoningMiddelburg, Nederland, March 2021IntroductionThe purpose of the comments is to encourage people to read the Bible. The original web address of the comments is www.kingcomments.com. The comments that are available have been translated from Dutch into English. It is planned that, God willing, the four lacking comments will be translated and made available in the course of this year 2021. The comments are intended to help you study the Bible personally. The Bible quotations written in full in the commentaries are from the New American Standard Bible-NASB 1995.The comments on Job, Psalms and Isaiah are written together with Tony Jonathan. The commentary on Ezekiel was written in close collaboration with Ron Vellekoop.The Bible is the infallible, everlasting Word of God. The Bible is about the Son of God, Who became Man to die on the cross for sinful people. God raised Him from the dead and He is now in heaven. Anyone who confesses his sins and believes in the Son and His work of atonement on the cross will not perish but receive eternal life. Such a person is a child of God. God tells His children in His Word how to live to His glory and all that He intends to give them, because of their connection to His Son.DownloadsOn the website https://www.oudesporen.nl/artikelen.php?aut=1&l=EN the Bible commentaries and publications that have been translated into English are available or will become available, Lord willing. They can be downloaded for free as PDF, e-pub and mobi.Wikipedia... Show more
L.M. Grant
L. M. Grant's Commentary on the Bible

This is commentary on different books of Bible by L M Grant. Contains introduction to each Book and commentary at Chapter Level Only. There is no commentary at each verse Level. There are some books and chapters the original author himself omitted. You may not find comments for them.

Brother Grant was born May 29th. 1917, in the town of Innisvale, Alberta, Canada. His early years were spent on a family farm. He was one of the eleven children of Gilbert and Mary Grant.In his youth, brother Leslie was extremely shy. He would often hide himself when company came to his family home. In view of his shyness, one can imagine the feelings he had when, attending a gospel service with his parents, he was impressed that one day he too, would be standing in front of others preaching, even though (at that time) he was not saved.Brother Grant was brought to the Lord as his Saviour at the age of 17, through the exercise of a near-drowning experience. His early adult years were spent in working for an optical firm, where he continued until the age of 25. At that time he was called of the Lord to full-time service in the Gospel. He had been under exercise about service on a full-time basis through contact with a cousin who was in the Lord's work. He has often remarked that the Lord thrust him out into the work, and his 'commendation' was from the Lord Himself, very similar to what we read in Gal. 1: 15-16. After his calling he spent much time in the reading and study of the Word, and in travelling among the farmers by bicycle in the Peace River country of Northern Alberta. During that time he lived in a trapper's cabin, while continuing the Gospel effort among the local population. Some of the fruit of labour from those years was the assembly in Westlock, Alberta.Though brother Leslie confined most of his work to the Canadian provinces, he did come to the U.S.A. periodically and would speak in the Gospel at conferences in St. Maries, Idaho, Minneapolis, Minnesota and elsewhere. During those years he made acquaintances with others active in Gospel work, as Jerry Davies, Bro. Leonards and Don Johnson. On January 8th. 1948, Frances Smiley from Staples, Minnesota, and Leslie were united in marriage. They made their home in Westlock, Alberta, where they started a family that eventually consisted of two sons and seven daughters.During this time he continued in the ministry God had given him, and also undertook carpentry, building his own home at Westlock, and a good part of the meeting hall in Edmonton. He felt his activity in practical matters gave some needed perspective to his spiritual labours.Though very busy he made it a practice to write comments on his morning readings, (a practice he still follows); these books in turn would become the basis for several of the books he has written [com-e.g. Romans and Hebrews] on spiritual truths which have been published. He is a frequent contributor to various current periodicals, Bible study lessons and calendar readings, while maintaining an active travel schedule among the assemblies with which he has practical links of fellowship.Brother Leslie, sister Frances and the children still at home, moved to Seattle, Washington in 1974. They have remained in the Seattle area to date, with many of the children and their spouses residing near.As is true of all of us, he was especially helped by several brethren now gone home to be with the Lord. He mentions bros. Dewar, Rogers, Tomkinson and Paulsen. Many others also, not identified here but known to the Lord, have been a mutual encouragement through the years.Our brother has been a great help in the local assembly, both by example (not lording it over the Lord's heritage) and by precept, with sound teaching and exhortation. He remains very modest, and likely would prefer that nothing of his past be known, so that the excellency of Christ would be everything. He is also a gifted poetry writer and many of his poems are in print.The compiler of these notes was told by brother Leslie that a great ambition of his was to be a career golfer. That came to an end when he was converted. He sustained a severe accident when a car in which he was travelling over a bridge, was involved in a collision and he was thrown out from the passenger seat on to the road. He was struck by a passing car and severely injured. The Lord healed him so that he could carry on the work that He had commissioned him to do.Wikipedia... Show more
Johann Peter Lange
Critical, Doctrinal and Homiletical

Valued for generations and consulted by Bible scholars everywhere, John Peter Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scripture has withstood the test of time. Hundreds of times per year, even today, Lange is quoted and cited in dissertations and books. Lange's is one of the finest academic commentary sets that has ever been produced.

Johann Peter Lange (April 10, 1802, Sonneborn (now a part of Wuppertal) - July 9, 1884, age 82), was a German Calvinist theologian of peasant origin.He was born at Sonneborn near Elberfeld, and studied theology at Bonn (from 1822) under K. I. Nitzsch and G. C. F. L�held several pastorates, and eventually (1854) settled at Bonn as professor of theology in succession to Isaac August Dorner, becoming also in 1860 counsellor to the consistory.Lange has been called the poetical theologian par excellence: "It has been said of him that his thoughts succeed each other in such rapid and agitated waves that all calm reflection and all rational distinction become, in a manner, drowned" (F. Lichtenberger).As a dogmatic writer he belonged to the school of Schleiermacher. His Christliche Dogmatik (5 vols, 1849-1852; new edition, 1870) "contains many fruitful and suggestive thoughts, which, however, are hidden under such a mass of bold figures and strange fancies and suffer so much from want of clearness of presentation, that they did not produce any lasting effect" (Otto Pfleiderer).Wikipedia... Show more
Matthew Henry
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Henry's one volume Concise Commentary provides a condensed look at nearly every verse in the Bible. The original was written in 1706.

Matthew Henry was born near Wales on October 18, 1662.Henry was primarily home-educated by his father, Rev. Philip Henry, and also at the Thomas Doolittle academy from 1680-1682. Henry first started studying law in 1686, but instead of pursuing a career in law he began to preach in his neighborhood.After the declaration of liberty of conscience by James II in 1687, he was privately ordained in London, and on June 2, 1687, he began his regular ministry as non-conformist pastor of a Presbyterian congregation at Chester. He remained in this position for 25 years. After declining several times offers from London congregations, he finally accepted a call to Hackney, London, and began his ministry there May 18, 1712, shortly before his death.Henry's reputation rests upon his renowned commentary, An Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1708-10, known also as Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible). He lived to complete it only as far as to the end of the Acts, but after his death other like-minded authors prepared the remainder from Henry's manuscripts. This work was long celebrated as the best English commentary for devotional purposes and the expanded edition was initially published in 1896. Instead of critical exposition, Henry focuses on practical suggestion, and his commentaries contains rich stores of truths. There is also a smaller devotional commentary on the Bible from Henry known as Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary.Spurgeon used Henry's commentary and commended it heartily, saying: "Every minister ought to read it entirely and carefully through once at least."Matthew Henry died in Cheshire due to a stroke, on June 22, 1714.Wikipedia... Show more
Matthew Poole
Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Finished by friends after his death, Matthew Poole's two volume commentary on the Bible is highly regarded for his very prudent and judicious expositions. Considered one of the great Puritans, few names will stand so high as Poole's in the Biblical scholarship of Great Britain.

Matthew Poole (1624 - 1679) was an English Nonconformist theologian.He was born at York, the son of Francis Pole, but he spelled his name Poole, and in Latin Polus; his mother was a daughter of Alderman Toppins there. He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, from 1645, under John Worthington. Having graduated B.A. at the beginning of 1649, he succeeded Anthony Tuckney, in the sequestered rectory of St Michael le Querne, then in the fifth classis of the London province, under the parliamentary system of presbyterianism. This was his only preferment. He proceeded M.A. in 1652. On 14 July 1657 he was one of eleven Cambridge graduates incorporated M.A. at Oxford on occasion of the visit of Richard Cromwell as chancellor.Poole was a jure divino presbyterian, and an authorised defender of the views on ordination of the London provincial assembly, as formulated by William Blackmore. After the Restoration, in a sermon of 26 August 1660 before the lord mayor Sir Thomas Aleyn at St Paul's Cathedral, he made a case for simplicity of public worship. On the passing of the Uniformity Act 1662 he resigned his living, and was succeeded by R. Booker on 29 August 1662.Perhaps the only true rival to Matthew Henry! A standard for more than 400 years, Poole's insightful commentary continues to be a trusted resource for pastors and laypeople. Offering verse-by-verse exposition, he also includes summaries for each chapter and book, questions and answers, information on cultural context, historical impact, and cross-references. Practical, readable, and applicable.Though he occasionally preached and printed some tracts, Poole made no attempt to gather a congregation. He had a patrimony of £100 a year, on which he lived.He was one of those who presented to the king 'a cautious and moderate thanksgiving' for the indulgence of 15 March 1672, and were offered royal bounty. Gilbert Burnet reports, on Edward Stillingfleet's authority, that Poole received for two years a pension of �50. Early in 1675 he entered with Richard Baxter into a negotiation for comprehension, promoted by John Tillotson, which came to nothing. According to Henry Sampson, Poole made provision for a nonconformist ministry and day-school at Tunbridge Wells, Kent.In his depositions relative to the alleged Popish plot (September 1678), Titus Oates had represented Poole as marked for assassination, because of his tract (1666) on the Nullity of the Romish Faith. Poole gave some credit to this, reportedly after a scare on returning home one evening near Clerkenwell with Josiah Chorley. Poole left England, and settled at Amsterdam. Here he died on 12 October 1679 (N.S.), and was buried in a vault of the English Reformed Church, Amsterdam. His wife was buried on 11 August 1668 at St Andrew Holborn, Stillingfleet preaching the funeral sermon. He left a son, who died in 1697.In 1654 Poole published a tract against John Biddle. In 1658 he put forward a scheme for a scholarship for university courses, for those intending to enter the ministry. The plan was approved by Worthington and Tuckney, and had the support also of John Arrowsmith, Ralph Cudworth, William Dillingham, and Benjamin Whichcote. Money was raised, and supported William Sherlock at Peterhouse. His Vox Clamantis gives his view of the ecclesiastical situation after 1662.The work with which his name is principally associated is the Synopsis criticorum biblicorum (5 vols fol., 1669-1676), in which he summarizes the views of one hundred and fifty biblical critics. On the suggestion of William Lloyd, Poole undertook the Synopsis as a digest of biblical commentators, from 1666. It took ten years, with relaxation often at Henry Ashurst's house. The prospectus of Poole's work mustered of eight bishops and five continental scholars. A patent for the work was obtained on 14 October 1667, and the first volume was ready for the press, when difficulties were raised by Cornelius Bee, publisher of the Critici Sacri (1660); the matter was decided in Poole's favour. Rabbinical sources and Roman Catholic commentators are included; little is taken from John Calvin, nothing from Martin Luther. The book was written in Latin and is currently being translated into English by the Matthew Poole Project.Poole also wrote English Annotations on the Holy Bible, a work which was completed by several of his Nonconformist brethren, and published in 2 vols fol. in 1683. The work was continued by others (last edition, three volumes, 1840). This work has chapter outlines which are among the best available.Wikipedia... Show more
Peter Pett
Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

In this modernly written verse-by-verse commentary of the Bible (see book exclusions below), Dr. Peter Pett leads the reader through the Scriptures with accuracy and insight. Students and scholars alike will delight at Pett's clear and direct style, concisely examining the original text, its writers, translations and above all, the God who inspired it. Study the bible online.

Dr. Peter Pett BA BD (Hons-London) DD is a retired Baptist minister and college lecturer. He holds a BD (good honours) from King's College London and was trained at what is now the London School of Theology (formerly London Bible College).Commentary excludes 1 and 2 Chronicles, Esther, Job, and Psalms 67-150 because the material has not yet been written.Wikipedia... Show more
Joseph Exell
Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

Published in 1892, its 19,000+ pages, 37 volume commentary covered the entire Bible with passage homiletics from several authors; historical, cultural, and geographical information; verse by verse exposition; point by point sermons with cross-reference aids in developing Bible studies and sermons.

The Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary, by Joseph Exell, William Jones, George Barlow, W. Frank Scott, and others, was published in 37 volumes as a sermon preparation and study resource. It is a commentary "written by preachers for preachers" and offers thousands of pages of:Although originally purposed as a minister's preparation tool, the Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary is also a fine personal study supplement.Wikipedia... Show more
C.I. Scofield
Scofield's Reference Notes

People have relied on this reference work in their daily studies for more than 90 years. C. I. Scofield intended to provide a concise yet complete tool to help the new reader of the Bible. Originally written in 1909.

The first Scofield Study Bible, published in 1909 and revised in 1917, is one of the most influential theological works of the early 20th century.Edited by Cyrus Ingerson Scofield, the Scofield Reference Bible was published by the Oxford University Press and became known to many as a handbook of fundamental theology.The Scofield Reference Bible contains very brief commentary, often consisting of no more than a few sentences and several cross-references. The brevity of the notes allowed Scofield's commentary to be included in the margins and footnotes in study Bibles, which countless Christians use as their primary study Bible.A modern version of the Reference Notes (called the New Scofield Reference Bible) exists, but is a 1967 revision bearing no real relation to C. I. Scofield.Wikipedia... Show more
William Nicoll
Sermon Bible Commentary

This was a 12 volume, chapter by chapter commentary of 4,800 sermon outlines and 24,000 homiletic references that the editor compiled from authors he liked. The Sermon Bible was compiled/edited by William Robertson Nicoll who also edited the Expositor's Bible Commentary.

Sir William Robertson Nicoll CH (October 10, 1851 - May 4, 1923) was a Scottish Free Church minister, journalist, editor, and man of letters.Nicoll was born in Lumsden, Aberdeenshire, the son of a Free Church minister. He was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School and graduated MA at the University of Aberdeen in 1870, and studied for the ministry at the Free Church Divinity Hall there until 1874, when he was ordained minister of the Free Church at Dufftown, Banffshire. Three years later he moved to Kelso, and in 1884 became editor of The Expositor for Hodder & Stoughton, a position he held until his death.In 1885 Nicoll was forced to retire from pastoral ministry after an attack of typhoid had badly damaged his lung. In 1886 he moved south to London, which became the base for the rest of his life. With the support of Hodder and Stoughton he founded the British Weekly, a Nonconformist newspaper, which also gained great influence over opinion in the churches in Scotland.Nicoll secured many writers of exceptional talent for his paper (including Marcus Dods, J. M. Barrie, Ian Maclaren, Alexander Whyte, Alexander Maclaren, and James Denney), to which he added his own considerable talents as a contributor. He began a highly popular feature, "Correspondence of Claudius Clear", which enabled him to share his interests and his reading with his readers. He was also the founding editor of The Bookman from 1891, and acted as chief literary adviser to the publishing firm of Hodder & Stoughton.Among his other enterprises were The Expositor's Bible and The Theological Educator. He edited The Expositor's Greek Testament (from 1897), and a series of Contemporary Writers (from 1894), and of Literary Lives (from 1904).He projected but never wrote a history of The Victorian Era in English Literature, and edited, with T. J. Wise, two volumes of Literary Anecdotes of the Nineteenth Century. He was knighted in 1909, ostensibly for his literrary work, but in reality probably more for his long-term support for the Liberal Party. He was appointed to the Order of the Companions of Honour (CH) in the 1921 Birthday Honours.Wikipedia... Show more
Charles Haddon Spurgeon
Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible

As the most widely read and often quoted preacher in history, Charles Haddon Spurgeon demostrated his understanding of the Scriptures through these brief expositions of passages from the Holy Scripture. Study the bible online.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) was born in Essex, England. After preaching his first sermon at the age of 16, he became pastor of the church in Waterbeach at the age of 17. His most fruitful years of ministry were at the New Park Street and later the Metropolitan Tabernacle pulpit in London. Called the "Prince of Preachers," he had more than 1,900 sermons published prior to his death.Before each weekly sermon, Spurgeon read a passage of Scripture, often interrupting his readings with spontaneous verse by verse comments to expose the Scripture's meaning and content. Many of these expositions were published at the end of his weekly sermons in The Sword and The Trowel.However, they have never before been published as a work to themselves. Three volumes are here published under the title Spurgeon's Expositions of the Bible containing a complete compilation of those expositions. While not every scripture of the Bible was covered in his transcribed expositions, this mammoth project has resulted in a "virtual" concise Bible commentary.Wikipedia... Show more
Joseph Sutcliffe
Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

This commentary represents 40 years of Sutcliffe's study of the Bible. After retiring at age 74, he compiled this commentary from his Bible study notes he accumulated over the years. The commentary is mostly expositional with some exegetical comments and Hebrew/Greek analysis.

Joseph Sutcliffe, M.A., an English Wesleyan minister, was born at Baildon, Yorkshire. He was converted in early life and became a circuit riding preacher at age 24.He was appointed by John Wesley to Redruth in 1786. Sutcliffe introduced Methodism into the Scilly Isles in 1788, and spent the last twenty years of his life in retirement in London, where he died May 14, 1856 at age 94.His course was one of "unspotted Christian purity and progressive excellence. In Biblical scholarship he especially excelled." He was an indefatigable writer, publishing in all thirty-two works on religious subjects, the chief being this A Commentary on the Old and New Testament.This commentary represents 40 years of Sutcliffe's study of the Bible. After retiring at age 74, he compiled this commentary from his Bible study notes he accumulated over the years. The commentary is mostly expositional with some exegetical comments and Hebrew/Greek analysis.Wikipedia... Show more
Joseph Exell
The Biblical Illustrator

Over 34,000 pages in its original 56 volume printing, the

Over 34,000 pages in its original 56 volume printing, the Biblical Illustrator is a massive compilation of treatments on 10,000 passages of Scripture. It is arranged in commentary form for ease of use in personal study and devotion, as well as sermon preparation.Most of the content of this commentary is illustrative in nature, and includes from hundreds of famous authors of the day such as Dwight L. Moody, Charles Spurgeon, J. C. Ryle, Charles Hodge, Alexander MacLaren, Adam Clark, Matthew Henry, and many more. The collection also includes lesser known authors published in periodicles and smaller publications popular in that ara. Unlike modern publishers, Exell was apparently not under any pressure to consolidate the number of pages.While this commentary is not known for its Greek or Hebrew exposition, the New Testament includes hundreds of references to, and explanations of, Greek words.Joseph S. Exell edited and compiled the 56 volume Biblical Illustrator commentary. You will recognize him as the co-editor of the famous Pulpit Commentary (this commentary is even larger than the Pulpit Commentary). This remarkable work is the triumph of a life devoted to Biblical research and study. Assisted by a small army of students, the Exell draws on the rich stores of great minds since the beginning of New Testament times.The Biblical Illustrator brings Scripture to life in a unique, illuminating way. While other commentaries explain a Bible passage doctrinally, this work illustrates the Bible with a collection of:Wikipedia... Show more
Joseph Parker
The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

Joseph Parker was an English Congregational minister. Parker was pre-eminently a preacher, and his published works are chiefly sermons and expositions. This commentary was one of his greatest works and was republished later as

Joseph Parker (9 April 1830 - 28 November 1902) was an English Congregational minister.Parker's preaching differed widely from his contemporaries like Spurgeon and Alexander Maclaren. He did not follow outlines or list his points, but spoke extemporaneously, inspired by his view of the spirit and attitude behind his Scripture text. He expressed himself frankly, with conviction and passion. His transcriber commented that he was at his best when he strayed furthest from his loose outlines.He did not often delve into detailed textual or critical debates. His preaching was neither systematic theology nor expository commentary, but sound more like his personal meditations. Writers of the time describe his delivery as energetic, theatrical and impressive, attracting at various times famous people and politicians such as William Gladstone.Parker's chief legacy is not his theology but his gift for oratory. Alexander Whyte commented on Parker: "He is by far the ablest man now standing in the English-speaking pulpit. He stands in the pulpit of Thomas Goodwin, the Atlas of Independency. And Dr. Parker is a true and worthy successor to this great Apostolic Puritan." Among his biographers, Margaret Bywater called him "the most outstanding preacher of his time," and Angus Watson wrote that "no one had ever spoken like him."Another writer and pastor, Ian Maclaren, offered the following tribute: "Dr. Parker occupies a lonely place among the preachers of our day. His position among preachers is the same as that of a poet among ordinary men of letters."Wikipedia... Show more
Paul E. Kretzmann
The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

The Popular Commentary of the Bible by Paul E. Kretzmann, Ph. D., D. D., has been a favorite among confessional Lutherans since publication of the first volume in 1921. The four volume work, completed in 1924, consists of nearly 3,000 pages. Kretzmann, as it is popularly known, has been out of print for quite some time.

The Popular Commentary is Lutheran to the core. Dr. Paul E. Kretzmann's commentary reproduces Luther, his theology and religion, his faith and piety. Dr. Kretzmann's commentary offers to Lutheran Christians nothing but sound, scriptural doctrine on the basis of believing, Biblical scholarship. Because of this, the Popular Commentary possesses a unique distinction. It is a popular commentary in the truest sense of the term; a commentary for the people and offering to the people nothing but unalloyed exposition of the Bible.About the AuthorPaul Edward Kretzmann was born in Farmers Retreat, Indiana in 1883. His early education started in Fort Wayne, Indiana at Concordia College and he went on to earn his Ph.D. and D.D. at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis Missouri. From 1906-1907 he moved to Shady Bend, Kansas to pastor a church and in 1907-1912 he resettled in Denver, Colorado. Kretzmann then traveled to St. Paul, Minnesota where he accepted a professorship at Concordia College from 1912-1919.Concordia's Literary Board of 1918 initiated the undertaking of The Popular Commentary and, after very mature consideration, nominated the author and drafted the general character and scope of this popular commentary. Accordingly Kretzmann, was called from the position of instructor to work on this project. The two volumes on the New Testament were published in 1921 and 1922 respectively and in April of 1923 Kretzmann wrote the concluding chapters on the Old Testament. He helped form the the Orthodox Lutheran Conference in 1948 and was president of it's seminary in Minneapolis, Minnesota.Wikipedia... Show more
Thomas Coke
Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

A Commentary on the Holy Bible, six complete volumes (1801-1803), written by the Methodist Missionary Thomas Coke, whom John Wesley called his "right hand." Coke is regarded as one of the founders of the Methodist Church in the United States. Francis Asbury called Coke "the greatest man in the last century" in his memorial sermon.

Thomas Coke (9 September 1747 - 2 May 1814) was the first Methodist Bishop and is known as the Father of Methodist Missions.Born in Brecon, south Wales, his father was a well-to-do apothecary. Coke, who was only 5 foot and 1 inch tall and prone to being overweight, read Jurisprudence at Jesus College, Oxford, which has a strong Welsh tradition, graduating Bachelor of Arts, then Master of Arts in 1770, and Doctor of Civil Law in 1775. On returning to Brecon he served as Mayor in 1772.A Commentary on the Holy Bible, six complete volumes (1801-1803), is an indepth look at the Old and New Testaments, with the following print volumes combined into the commentary here: Wikipedia... Show more
Samuel Bagster
Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge has provided a cross-reference resource for Bible students worldwide for generations. This highly respected and nearly exhaustive compilation was developed by R.A. Torrey from references in Thomas Scott's Commentary and the Comprehensive Bible. With nearly 500,000 cross-references it is the most thorough source available.

The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge was, and still is, a Bible reference work first published around 1830, created by the London publisher Samuel Bagster (1772-1851). It is a set of cross-references. That is, it consists entirely of a book-length listing of cross-references, showing only the chapter and verse citations with no accompanying text. About the size of a complete Bible, the TSK is also organized like a Bible, beginning at Genesis and ending at Revelation. Each verse of the Bible is cross-referenced to several others to enable the reader to gain a true sense of each word and phrase as it is used in the Bible.But the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge is usually described as being the work of R. A. Torrey. Most editions you can buy these days have Torrey's name on the cover, and sometimes in the title: R. A. Torrey's Treasury of Scripture Knowledge. According to commen knowledge, Torrey did not specifically try to claim authorship of the reference book, but he did become one of its chief promoters, and as his own fame rose, his endorsement of the book mattered to more and more people. Inevitably his name ended up on the cover. But if you read his introduction to the book, often printed inside, you see that he describes having first encountered it "some twenty years ago."Originally printed in a 700+ page book and now enhanced with two-way cross-referencing, this entire reference is available to you on StudyLight.org.Wikipedia... Show more
Robert Neighbour
Wells of Living Water Commentary

Published in 1939-1940, this is a timeless collection of Biblical analysis, exposition, and truths with a unique blend of literary creativity. The metaphor of a water well perfectly describes the depth of thought and spiritual clarity.

Published in 1939-1940, this is a timeless collection of Biblical analysis, exposition, and truths with a unique blend of literary creativity. The metaphor of a water well perfectly describes the depth of thought and spiritual clarity.This commentary began from the author's sermon notes and was published in 14 volumes.Dr. Robert Edward Neighbour worked extensively with Southern Baptist missions and pastored a number of churches, including the First Baptist Church of Atlanta, GA. While there, he started the Baptist Bible Union and left the Southern Baptist denomination behind. After a number of years at the helm of the BBU, he left and continued his work as an evangelist and missionary until his death in 1945.Wikipedia... Show more
John Wesley
Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Produced between 1754 and 1765, Wesley's commentary on the whole Bible has stood the test of time.

John Wesley was a Church of England cleric and Christian theologian. Wesley is largely credited, along with his brother Charles Wesley, as founding the Methodist movement which began when he took to open-air preaching in a similar manner to George Whitefield. In contrast to George Whitefield's Calvinism, Wesley embraced the Arminian doctrines that were dominant in the 18th-century Church of England. Methodism in both forms was a highly successful evangelical movement in the United Kingdom, which encouraged people to experience Jesus Christ personally.Wesley's writing and preachings provided the seeds for both the modern Methodist movement and the Holiness movement, which encompass numerous denominations across the world. In addition, he refined Arminianism with a strong evangelical emphasis on the Reformed doctrine of justification by faith.Wesley was a logical thinker and expressed himself clearly, concisely and forcefully in writing. His written sermons are characterised by spiritual earnestness and simplicity. They are doctrinal but not dogmatic. His Notes on the New Testament (1755) are enlightening. Both the Sermons (about 140) and the Notes are doctrinal standards. Wesley was a fluent, powerful and effective preacher. He usually preached spontaneously and briefly, though occasionally at great length.Wikipedia... Show more
Daniel Whedon
Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Dr. Daniel D. Whedon was a central figure in the struggle between Calvinism and Arminianism. He devoted 25 years to writing the New Testament commentaries. Other authors wrote the Old Testament commentaries with Whedon serving as the editor. Study the bible online.

Daniel Whedon was born in 1808 in Onondaga, N.Y. Dr. Whedon was well qualified as a commentator. He was professor of Ancient Languages in Wesleyan University, studied law and had some years of pastoral experience. He was editor of the Methodist Quarterly Review for more than twenty years. Besides many articles for religious papers he was also the author of the well-known and important work, Freedom of the Will. Dr. Whedon was noted for his incisive, vigorous style, both as preacher and writer. He died at Atlantic Highlands, N.J., June 8, 1885.Whedon was a pivotal figure in the struggle between Calvinism and Arminianism in the nineteenth-centry America. As a result of his efforts, some historians have concluded that he was responsible for a new doctrine of man that was more dependent upon philosophical principles than scripture.Wikipedia... Show more

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