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John Greenleaf Whittier
Of all sad words of tongue or pen, the saddest are these, 'It might have been.
topics: life , words  
Anne Bradstreet
Sweet words are like honey, a little may refresh, but too much gluts the stomach.
topics: flattery , praise , words  
C.S. Lewis
Don't say it was delightful; make us say delightful when we've read the description. You see, all those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are only like saying to your readers Please will you do the job for me.
552 likes
John Bunyan
In prayer it is better to have a heart without words than words without a heart.
491 likes
Thomas a Kempis
In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro.
482 likes
Benjamin Franklin
The person who deserves most pity is a lonesome one on a rainy day who doesn't know how to read.
437 likes
Helen Keller
Literature is my Utopia
379 likes
Byron J. Rees
How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book.
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Martin Luther King, Jr.
One of the great tragedies of life is that men seldom bridge the gulf between practice and profession, between doing and saying. A persistent schizophrenia leaves so many of us tragically divided against ourselves. On the one hand, we proudly profess certain sublime and noble principles, but on the other hand, we sadly practise the very antithesis of these principles. How often are our lives characterised by a high blood pressure of creeds and an anaemia of deeds! We talk eloquently about our commitment to the principles of Christianity, and yet our lives are saturated with the practices of paganism. We proclaim our devotion to democracy, but we sadly practise the very opposite of the democratic creed. We talk passionately about peace, and at the same time we assiduously prepare for war. We make our fervent pleas for the high road of justice, and then we tread unflinchingly the low road of injustice. This strange dichotomy, this agonising gulf between the and the , represents the tragic theme of man's earthly pilgrimage.
190 likes
Henry Ward Beecher
All words are pegs to hang ideas on.
topics: words , writing  
186 likes
Helen Keller
In a word, literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourse of my book-friends. They talk to me without embarrassment or awkwardness. The things I have learned and the things I have been taught seem of ridiculously little importance compared with their "large loves and heavenly charities.
176 likes
Byron J. Rees
A written word is the choicest of relics. It is something at once more intimate with us and more universal than any other work of art. It is the work of art nearest to life itself. It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips; -- not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.
175 likes
C.S. Lewis
The books or the music in which we thought the beauty was located will betray us if we trust to them; it was not in them, it only came through them, and what came through them was longing. These things—the beauty, the memory of our own past—are good images of what we really desire; but if they are mistaken for the thing itself they turn into dumb idols, breaking the hearts of their worshipers. For they are not the thing itself; they are only the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.
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William Cowper
And empty words are evil.
144 likes
J.C. Ryle
Fear not because your prayer is stammering, your words feeble, and your language poor. Jesus can understand you.
J.C. Ryle  
51 likes
Thomas Carlyle
The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison.
46 likes
G.K. Chesterton
[W]e talk about the tyranny of words, but we like to tyrannise over them too; we are fond of having a large superfluous establishment of words to wait upon us on great occasions; we think it looks important, and sounds well. As we are not particular about the meaning of our liveries on state occassions, if they be but fine and numerous enough, so, the meaning or necessity of our words is a secondary consideration, if there be but a great parade of them. And as individuals get into trouble by making too great a show of liveries, or as slaves when they are too numerous rise against their masters, so I think I could mention a nation that has got into many great difficulties, and will get into many greater, from maintaining too large a retinue of words.
topics: loquacity , words  
33 likes
Helen Keller
Many scholars forget, it seems to me, that our enjoyment of the great works of literature depends more upon the depth of our sympathy than upon our understanding. The trouble is that very few of their laborious explanations stick in the memory. The mind drops them as a branch drops its overripe fruit. ... Again and again I ask impatiently, "Why concern myself with these explanations and hypotheses?" They fly hither and thither in my thought like blind birds beating the air with ineffectual wings. I do not mean to object to a thorough knowledge of the famous works we read. I object only to the interminable comments and bewildering criticisms that teach but one thing: there are as many opinions as there are men.
24 likes
C.S. Lewis
But the greatest cause of verbicide is the fact that most people are obviously far more anxious to express their approval and disapproval of things than to describe them. Hence the tendency of words to become less descriptive and more evaluative; then become evaluative, while still retaining some hint of the sort of goodness or badness implied; and to end up by being purely evaluative -- useless synonyms for or for .
20 likes
Benjamin Franklin
A man of words and not of deeds, Is like a garden full of weeds.
topics: deeds , garden , weeds , words  
19 likes

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